Registrar – Eastman School of Music

06.00 Graduate Professional Curricula (MM, DMA)

Contents:

06.01 General Information
06.01.01 Graduate Professional Division
06.01.02 Ensemble Participation
06.01.03 Graduate Juries
06.01.04 Graduate Recitals
06.02 The Master of Music Degree
06.02.01 List of Majors offered within the MM Degree
06.02.02 Residency & Time Limits for MM Degrees
06.02.03 Placement Examinations, Listening Exam, and Remedial Courses (MM)
06.02.04 MM Elective Course Restrictions
06.02.05 MM – Major in Composition
06.02.06 MM – Major in Conducting
06.02.07 MM – Major in Early Music (Emphasis in Historical Plucked Instruments)
06.02.08 MM – Major in Jazz Studies & Contemporary Media
06.02.08.01 MM – Major in Contemporary Media/Film Composition
06.02.09 MM – Major in Music Education
06.02.10 MM – Major in Opera (Stage Directing)
06.02.11 MM – Major in Performance and Literature
06.02.12 MM – Major in Piano Accompanying and Chamber Music
06.03 The Doctor of Musical Arts Degree
06.03.01 Continuation from MM to DMA Degree
06.03.02 List of Majors within the DMA Degree
06.03.03 Residency & Time Limits (DMA)
06.03.04 Remedial Courses (DMA)
06.03.05 Program of Study – General Information (DMA)
06.03.06 Lecture Recital (DMA)
06.03.07 Comprehensive Exam & Candidacy (DMA)
06.03.08 Dissertation/Doctoral Research Project
06.03.09 DMA – Major in Composition
06.03.10 DMA – Major in Conducting
06.03.11 DMA – Major in Early Music (Emphasis in Historical Plucked Instruments)
06.03.12 DMA – Major in Jazz Studies & Contemporary Media
06.03.13 DMA – Major in Music Education
06.03.14 DMA – Major in Performance & Literature
06.03.15 DMA – Major in Piano Accompanying & Chamber Music

06.01 General Information

Master of Music in Piano Accompanying and Chamber Music, Performance and Literature, Opera (stage directing), Music Education, Early Music, Composition, Conducting (choral or orchestral), and Jazz Studies and Contemporary Media (performance or writing).

Doctor of Musical Arts in Piano Accompanying and Chamber Music, Performance and Literature, Music Education, Early Music, Composition, Conducting (choral, orchestral, or wind ensemble), and Jazz Studies and Contemporary Media.

Information about graduate programs at the Eastman School of Music is available from the Office of Graduate Studies, academic advisors, and department chairs. Deadlines and scheduling information are listed in the graduate calendar. It is the responsibility of each graduate student to comply with all degree requirements and to initiate all requests for action pertaining to his or her program of study.

Requests or other communications requiring action by either of the graduate committees should be in the form of letters addressed to the Senior Associate Dean of Graduate Studies.

Activity in the division of Graduate Professional Studies is governed by the Graduate Professional Committee, a faculty committee comprising representatives from each of the School’s departments, chaired by the Senior Associate Dean of Graduate Studies. Programs within the division lead to the Master of Music and Doctor of Musical Arts degrees. Programs of study leading to these degrees are designed to foster broad intellectual development in conjunction with high competence in the performance of music. Subsequent to admission, the student is expected not only to do work of distinctly graduate character in the required courses, but also to demonstrate a substantial and consistent advance in performing ability. Emphasis on practical applied music is obtained to a greater or lesser degree in each of the major fields and constitutes a distinctive feature of the division.

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06.01.01 Graduate Professional Division

Programs of study leading to these degrees are designed to foster broad intellectual development in conjunction with high competence in the performance of music. Subsequent to admission, the student is expected not only to do work of distinctly graduate character in the required courses, but also to demonstrate a substantial and consistent advance in performing ability. Emphasis on practical applied music obtains to a greater or lesser degree in each of the major fields and constitutes a distinctive feature of the division. Information about graduate programs at the Eastman School of Music is available from the Senior Associate Dean of Graduate Studies, academic advisors, and department chairs. Exam dates, deadlines and other important information are listed in the graduate calendar.

Activity in the division of Graduate Professional Studies is governed by the Graduate Professional Committee – a faculty committee comprising representatives from each of the School’s departments which is chaired by the Senior Associate Dean of Graduate Studies. Any request or other communication requiring action by the Committee should be in the form of a letter addressed to the Graduate Professional Committee and submitted to the Graduate Studies Office. Please refer to the Graduate Calendar for submission guidelines.

It is the responsibility of each graduate student to comply with all degree requirements and to initiate all requests for action pertaining to his or her program of study. Any irregularities in the manner in which students satisfy the requirements of these degree programs (including double major or dual degree programs) must be approved by the Graduate Professional Committee.

Graduate degrees in composition and music education may be undertaken either within the division of Graduate Professional Studies (in the MM and DMA degree programs) or within the division of Graduate Research Studies (MA and PhD degree programs.) All MM and DMA degree programs have a strong performance emphasis, and require an audition on an instrument or voice for admission. MA and PhD degree programs emphasize research and analysis rather than performance.

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06.01.02 Ensemble Participation

All graduate students are encouraged to participate in the school’s large vocal and instrumental ensembles. Additional ensemble participation requirements are noted in the degree requirements for each major, where applicable.

No more than four credits earned for ensemble and/or chamber music courses may be included in the program of study for any student in the MM or DMA degree programs, except by special permission from the Graduate Professional Committee. Students who wish to participate in large ensembles, but do not wish to receive academic credit or pay tuition for the course in a given semester may do so by registering for one of the following options:

  • ENS 421 Graduate Vocal Ensembles (0 credits)
  • ENS 401 Graduate Instrumental Ensembles (0 credits)

Any ensemble may be recast as ENS 401 or ENS 421 for zero credit through the Registrar’s Office with permission of the instructor and the program advisor.

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06.01.03 Graduate Juries

Students must present at least one jury examination to allow ratification of any major or primary applied-music study included in their program of study. Jury examinations for all students are requested by their major applied teachers. Graduate juries will be graded as pass or fail, according to the expectations established by each department for their students. If a student fails the jury, the department will recommend one of two courses of action to the Senior Associate Dean of Graduate Studies:

  1. The student will be placed immediately on probation (resulting in the removal of any graduate award), with clear stipulations regarding the action that the student must take to be removed from probationary status. The time period of the probationary status will be conveyed to the student, as well as the consequences that will arise if the stipulations or time period are not observed.
  2. The department may recommend to the Senior Associate Dean of Graduate Studies that the student be given the option of registering for Inactive Status (ESM 985), for a stipulated length of time, in order to tend to the issues that may be at the root of the failed jury.

Students who are accepted to Eastman on the basis of self-made audition tapes (as opposed to a recording made during one of Eastman’s regional auditions) must pass their first performance jury during the first year. A student who fails this jury may be dismissed from the performance major or the School.

Students who, during previous degree programs at the Eastman School (bachelor’s or master’s), have attained the highest grade-level, or have been awarded the Performer’s Certificate, or the Artist’s Certificate, may be excused from the necessity of taking a graduate jury. A request to be excused from the jury must be made by the major applied teacher and approved by the department chair.

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06.01.04 Graduate Recitals

Students who intend to graduate at the end of the semester in which they present a degree recital should plan to perform that recital no later than the last day of classes. No degree recitals may occur after the last day of classes for either fall or spring semester.

Graduate students must be enrolled in applied lessons during any semester in which they present a degree recital. If a student was registered for lessons in the previous semester, they must complete their degree recital within the first 2 weeks of the following semester or else s/he must register for additional lessons.

Normally, graduate students majoring in Performance and Literature register for 460A, one-hour lessons. However, students may register for 430A, half-hour lessons with the permission of the Senior Associate Dean of Graduate Studies if they have already completed all of their applied lesson requirements, and are preparing their lecture recital (all students) or collaborative recital (DMA PRL Piano students only).

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06.02 The Master of Music Degree

All MM degree programs have a strong emphasis on applied instrumental or vocal study and performance, as well as broad intellectual development.

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06.02.01 List of Majors offered within the MM Degree

The following majors are offered within the master of music degree program:

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06.02.02 Residency & Time Limits for MM Degrees

Students in the master of music degree program are expected to complete all degree requirements within five years of their first registration. For example, if a student first registers in fall of 2007, all requirements must be completed by the end of the 2012 summer session.

Students who are unable to finish their program within five years may request an extension of time from the Graduate Professional Committee. Such requests should explain the circumstances which have caused the need for the extension. Such extension, if granted, will be of limited duration.

Residency requirements for the master of music degree vary by major. Students should consult the requirements for their individual major for further details. Students holding a graduate award (who normally take no more than 18 credits during a year) or those who find it necessary to take part-time employment should plan to devote at least two years to the master’s degree program. The exception to this general rule is the master of music in music education “summers only” program, which may be completed through consecutive summer enrollment.

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06.02.03 Placement Examinations, Listening Exam, and Remedial Courses (MM)

All entering graduate students are required to take placement examinations in music theory and music history before registering for any course. For more information about these exams, please see section 05.03 (Placement Examinations and Remediation).

MM Listening Exam

The Listening Exam is required for Master of Music degree students in the following majors: Performance and Literature (PRL), Piano Accompanying & Chamber Music (ACM), Early Music (EMH), Conducting (CNC and CNO), and Opera Stage Directing (OPS).

Students must take the Listening Exam upon entry to their degree program. If the student does not pass the exam, s/he must either re-take it the following year during the orientation period, or the student may enroll in MHS 435 Concert Repertoire: Museum or Living Art? (and pass it with a grade of B- or better) in lieu of taking the exam a second time. Students who pass the Listening Test may still choose to take MHS 435 as an elective course.

Students must fulfill this degree requirement either by examination or by passing the MHS 435 course with a grade of B- or better in order participate in the commencement ceremony.

The MM Listening Test evaluates the student’s ability to identify by ear specific works taken from a published list of works which represent a broad spectrum of historical periods and performance media. It also tests the student’s ability to identify works not on the published list, by style-period rather than by title, with some brief description of the characteristics of the work that suggest the period choices. The exam consists of 25 excerpts, 20 of which involve identification of specific works from the published list and 5 of which cover style-identification. The basic list of works is published annually and serves as the source for the Listening Test administered during orientation week. Copies of the list are available in the bins outside the Graduate Office, Room ESM 103 or on-line at http://learn.rochester.edu.

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06.02.04 MM Elective Course Restrictions

All courses taken for graduate credit must be at the graduate level, and numbered 200 or above. Without explicit permission from the Graduate Professional Committee, no more than four credits earned through Ensemble courses may be included in the program of study of a student in the MM program. Additional elective course restrictions are listed within the requirements for each individual major.

Policy for MM Students Matriculating in Fall 2007 or thereafter:

Graduate students are encouraged to explore courses offered in Eastman’s Arts Leadership program. Only 200-level ALC courses that are cross-listed with another department (e.g., MUE 504/ALC 222) may be taken for MM degree credit. These courses are subject to regular tuition charges.

Other ALC courses (400-level) may be elected by graduate students for non-degree credit free of charge. In such cases the ALP course may be used to bring the student to full-time status without incurring a tuition charge, but these courses do not fulfill graduate degree requirements.

Students who matriculated into their current MM degree program prior to fall 2007 may still take any ALC course at the 200-level for elective credit toward their degree.

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06.02.05 MM – Major in Composition

Degree requirement checklist for MM in Composition

Prerequisites: Prerequisites for the MM in Composition include at least 18 credit hours in undergraduate composition courses or the equivalent, at least 12 credit hours of lower division theory courses, and at least 12 credit hours of upper division courses in counterpoint and orchestration or equivalent. In addition, before admission to the master’s program, at least one large-scale work for ensemble should have been composed.

Upon entry to the program, master’s students take placement exams in music theory and history. If remediation is required, the appropriate courses are taken, but their credit does not count towards the master’s degree program of study. The same is true of any English language instruction that is required.

Residency: At least one year of full-time study is required. See section 05.01 (Residency) for more information.

Courses Credits
CMP 401, 402 (Advanced Composition) 6
CMP 491, 492 (Composition Symposium) 2
CMP 412 (Compositional Practice ca. 1925-1955) 3
Applied Music (460 lessons) 6
Electives –

The advisor, in consultation with the candidate, will choose at least nine additional hours of coursework in music theory, music history, and other related professional areas, depending on the background, needs, and interests of the student.  Elective courses must be numbered 200 or higher. Arts Leadership (ALC) courses do not count for elective credit.  Electives may include up to a maximum of four (4) credits of ensembles and/or chamber music, which includes all ENS and CHB courses with the exception of repertoire courses. Electives may include no more than six (6) credits of non- music courses.  Neither primary nor secondary lessons maybe used as elective credit.

9
CMP 496 (MM Thesis) – For candidates majoring in composition, a thesis in the form of extended composition for ensemble prepared under the guidance of the thesis advisor is required. The completed thesis will be reviewed by a committee of faculty who will evaluate the work. The committee’s approval of the thesis is a necessary prerequisite to degree conferral. 6
ESM 460 (Comprehensive Review) – Students are required to present a 30-minute lecture on their own music and progress toward the degree, followed by a question and answer session. This lecture will function as a comprehensive review and be evaluated by the Eastman composition faculty. The lecture will occur during the final semester of the master student’s course of studies. The departmental chair will schedule the lecture as part of a regular meeting of the weekly Composition Symposium.
ESM 401 (Recital) – The recital required of MM composition majors is of at least one-hour duration, features the candidate as solo performer in at least one work not composed by him or her, and contains at least one work (not necessarily the thesis) written by the student during his or her years of Eastman study.
Remedial courses – Please refer to 05.03 Orientation, Placement Examinations, and Remediation.
Total Credits 32

Jury: MM students in composition play a jury according to the requirements of the relevant performance department; the required recital typically occurs in the second year.

 

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06.02.06 MM – Major in Conducting

Prerequisites: Candidates must have significant experience as a performer and conductor.

Upon entry to the program, master’s students take placement exams in music theory and history. If remediation is required, the appropriate courses are taken, but their credit does not count towards the master’s degree program of study. The same is true of any English language instruction that is required.

Residency: Students in the MM Conducting program have a two-year residency requirement. See section 05.01 (Residency) for more information.

Students who enrolled in their current MM degree program prior to summer 2009 are not affected by the updates indicated below. Please click here for degree requirements for students who enrolled in spring 2009 or earlier.

Choral Conducting

  Degree requirement checklist for MM in Conducting for students entering summer 2009 or later.

Courses Credits
CND 423, 424 (Advanced Conducting I: Choral and Advanced Conducting II: Choral) 4
Four credits from among the following courses: CND 415-416 (Advanced Instrumental Conducting) and CND 461- 462 (Rehearsal Techniques) 4
Music History and Literature, including MHS 480 (Bibliography) and two of the following: MHS 421 (Middle Ages), MHS 422 (Renaissance), MHS 423 (Baroque), MHS 424 (Classic period), MHS 425 (19th Cent.), MHS 426 (20th Cent.) 8
TH 400 (Analytical Techniques) – students who received a bachelor’s degree from Eastman must take TH 401 instead of TH 400 3
ENS 420 (Chorale) 4
Applied Music (430 lessons) 3
CND 431, 432 (Choral Literature) 4
Electives – Elective courses must be numbered 200 or higher. Arts Leadership (ALC) courses do not count for elective credit. The total number of ensembles and/or chamber music credits counted toward the degree may not exceed four (4). This restriction includes all ENS and CHB courses, required or elective, with the exception of repertoire courses. Electives may include no more than six (6) credits of non-music courses. Neither primary nor secondary lessons maybe used as elective credit. 3
MM Listening Exam or pass MHS 435 Concert Repertoire with a grade of B- or better. MHS 435: Concert Repertoire may be counted for elective credit.
ESM 401 (MM Degree Recital) – Majors in choral conducting will conduct a recital with an Eastman ensemble. The public performances required of all Master of Music degree candidates must be approved by at least two members of the student’s major-department faculty.
ESM 455 (Wrtten and Oral Comprehensive Examinations)
Remedial courses – Please refer to 05.03 Orientation, Placement Examinations, and Remediation.
Total Credits 33

Foreign Language: Choral conducting students should have foreign language proficiency equivalent to one year of undergraduate study in French, Italian, or German. The degree of proficiency will be tested upon matriculation. If the student does not possess the necessary degree of proficiency, a foreign language will be a mandatory part of the student’s curriculum until it is attained. In this case, the student will be required to pass the second semester of a freshman-level language course with a grade of B or higher.

Lyric Diction: In addition to the degree recital, each candidate will be expected to pass an oral examination of lyric diction in English, Latin, German, and either French or Italian.

 

Orchestral Conducting

  Degree requirement checklist for MM in Conducting for students entering summer 2009 or later.

Courses
Credits
CND 481, 482, 483, 484 (Orchestral Conducting–one each semester)
12
CND 441-444 (Colloquy in Conducting)–one each semester, 0.5 cr. each
2
Music History and Literature, including MHS 480 (Bibliography) and two of the following: MHS 421 (Middle Ages), MHS 422 (Renaissance), MHS 423 (Baroque), MHS 424 (Classic period), MHS 425 (19th Cent.), MHS 426 (20th Cent.)
8
TH 400 (Analytical Techniques) – students who received a bachelor’s degree from Eastman must take TH 401 instead of TH 400
3
ENS 400 (Graduate Ensemble–2 sem. minimum)
2
Electives – Elective courses must be numbered 200 or higher. Arts Leadership (ALC) courses do not count for elective credit. The total number of ensembles and/or chamber music credits counted toward the degree may not exceed four (4). This restriction includes all ENS and CHB courses, required or elective, with the exception of repertoire courses. Electives may include no more than six (6) credits of non-music courses. Recommended electives include applied music (up to 3 credits); Orchestration; Advanced or Intermediate Keyboard Skills.
7
MM Listening Exam or pass MHS 435 Concert Repertoire with a grade of B- or better. MHS 435: Concert Repertoire may count for elective credit.
ESM 401 (MM Degree Recital) – Orchestral conducting students will be required to conduct a minimum of 2 short rehearsals with the conducting orchestra per month, and conduct a performance of one main orchestral work not less than 25 minutes in length. This performance is preceded by an oral examination on the work, held approximately two weeks prior to the performance. The jury for the oral examination and the performance will consist of three faculty members selected by the Conducting & Ensembles department.  
ESM 455 (MM Oral Examination)
Remedial courses – Please refer to 05.03 Orientation, Placement Examinations, and Remediation.
Total Credits
34

Foreign Language: Orchestral conducting students should have foreign language proficiency equivalent to one year of undergraduate study in French, Italian, or German. The degree of proficiency will be tested by written entrance examination upon matriculation. If the necessary degree of proficiency is not reached, a foreign language will be a mandatory part of the student’s curriculum until it is reached. In this case, the student will be required to pass the second semester of a freshman-level language course with a grade of B or higher.

 

Wind Ensemble Conducting

  Degree requirement checklist for MM in Conducting for students entering summer 2009 or later.

Courses
Credits
CND 229, 230 (Seminar in Wind Ensemble Conducting Repertoire) – two semesters, 2 credits each
4
CND 415, 416 (Advanced Instrumental Conducting) – two semesters, 2 credits each
4
CND 441-444 (Colloquy in Conducting)–one each semester, 0.5 cr. each
2
Music History and Literature, including MHS 480 (Bibliography) and two of the following: MHS 421 (Middle Ages), MHS 422 (Renaissance), MHS 423 (Baroque), MHS 424 (Classic period), MHS 425 (19th Cent.), MHS 426 (20th Cent.)
8
TH 400 (Analytical Techniques) – students who received a bachelor’s degree from Eastman must take TH 401 instead of TH 400
3
ENS 400 (Graduate Ensemble) — one each semester, 1 credit each
4
Electives – Elective courses must be numbered 200 or higher. Arts Leadership (ALC) courses do not count for elective credit. The total number of ensembles and/or chamber music credits counted toward the degree may not exceed four (4). This restriction includes all ENS and CHB courses, required or elective, with the exception of repertoire courses. Electives may include no more than six (6) credits of non-music courses. Recommended electives include applied music (up to 3 credits); Orchestration; Advanced or Intermediate Keyboard Skills.
8
MM Listening Exam or pass MHS 435 Concert Repertoire with a grade of B- or better. MHS 435: Concert Repertoire may count for elective credit.
ESM 455 (Oral Examination)
ESM 401 (Degree Recital) – one major wind orchestral work
Remedial courses – Please refer to 05.03 Orientation, Placement Examinations, and Remediation.
Total Credits
33

 

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06.02.07 MM – Major in Early Music (Emphasis in Historical Plucked Instruments)

Students who enrolled in their current MM degree program prior to summer 2009 are not affected by the updates indicated below. Please click here for degree requirements for students who enrolled in spring 2009 or earlier.

  Degree requirement checklist for MM in Early Music for students entering summer 2009 or later.

Prerequisites: Students applying to this program are required to have an undergraduate degree with a performance background.

Upon entry to the program, master’s students take placement exams in music theory and history. If remediation is required, the appropriate courses are taken, but their credit does not count towards the master’s degree program of study. The same is true of any English language instruction that is required.

Residency: At least one year of full-time study is required. See section 05.01 (Residency) for more information.

Courses Credits
Applied Music – 460A lessons in lute or harpsichord 12
MHS 480 (Bibliography) 2
MHS 422 (Music in the Renaissance) 3
MHS 423 (Music in the Baroque) 3
MHS 441 & 443 (Issues in Perf. Practice, Baroque Perf. Practice) 4
TH 451 or 452 (Counterpoint) 3
TH 475 or 476 (Intermediate or Advanced Keyboard Skills) ** [3]
ENS 207/208 (Collegium Musicum) or
CHB 277 (Baroque Chamber Ensemble)
2
PED 451 & 452 (Renaissance/Baroque Lute Literature and Pedagogy) * 4
KBD 443 and KBD 444 (Keyboard Continuo Realization I and II) or PRF 490 (Independent Study in Continuo for Lutenists) 2
KBD 407 (Harpsichord Perofmrnace & Literature) ** [2]
ESM 401 (Master’s Degree Recital)
MM Listening Exam or pass MHS 435 Concert Repertoire with a grade of B- or better. MHS 435: Concert Repertoire may count for elective credit.
ESM 455 (Oral Examination)
Remedial courses – Please refer to 05.03 Orientation, Placement Examinations, and Remediation.
Total Credits for Lute 35
Total Credits for Harpsichord [36]

* required for Lute/Early Guitar majors only
**required for Harpsichord majors only

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06.02.08 MM – Major in Jazz Studies & Contemporary Media

Degree requirement checklist for MM in Jazz Studies & Contemporary Media

Performance Emphasis (JCM)

Prerequisites: Candidates must demonstrate highly developed skills in improvisation, advanced knowledge of jazz theory, extensive experience in a small jazz-group setting, and at least two years of applied instruction on their primary instrument. Jazz writing majors must also have significant experience in jazz composition and arranging, plus some experience with non-jazz composition.

Upon entry to the program, master’s students take placement exams in music history, jazz theory, and functional jazz piano. If remediation is required, the appropriate courses are taken, but their credit does not count towards the master’s degree program of study. The same is true of any English language instruction that is required.

Placement tests: Entering jazz students will be given placement tests in music history, jazz theory, and functional jazz piano. Those students with deficiencies in these disciplines will be required to complete Music History Review (MHS 119); Jazz Theory and Ear Training, (JCM 119); and Functional Jazz piano (JCM 205-206). These credits are not included in the required credits for the degree.

Residency: At least one year of full-time study is required. See section 05.01 (Residency) for more information.

Courses Credits
Applied Music (JAZ 460A) – 4 semesters @ 4 credits each 16
JCM 451-452 (Jazz Performance Workshop – 1 credit per semester) 4
ENS 400J1 (Large Jazz Ensemble) formerly JCM 400 2
MHS 414 (History of Jazz Styles) formerly JCM 441 (Advanced History and Analysis of Jazz Styles) 3
PED 405 (Descriptive & Analytical Writing in Jazz) 1
PED 406 (Graduate Jazz Pedagogy) formerly JCM 406 2
JCM 491-492 (Jazz Forum) – 4 semesters 0
Electives2 6
JCM 4563 (Advanced Performance Projects-Contemporary Media) 0
ESM 402 (Recital): The recital represents work the student and his or her major applied music teacher have done together through registrations for study both before and concurrent with the time of the recital presentation. 0
Remedial courses – Please refer to 05.03 Orientation, Placement Examinations, and Remediation.
Total Credits 34
  1. The candidate must play in a large jazz ensemble every semester that he/she is in residence. After registering for 2 credits of ENS 400J, the student may opt to continue in ENS 400J and receive 1 credit per semester (up to a maximum of 4 credits), or register in ENS 401J for no credit.
  2. The student, in consultation with the advisor, will choose 6 additional hours of coursework depending on his/her background, needs, and interests. At least 2-3 hours of elective coursework must be from outside the JCM department. Elective courses must be numbered 200 or higher. Arts Leadership (ALC) courses do not count for elective credit unless cross-listed with another department. Neither primary nor secondary lessons maybe used as elective credit. Electives may include courses in music theory, composition, arranging, or other topics, as determined in consultation with the advisor.
  3. Recognizing that jazz musicians, in particular, must be entrepreneurial, the candidate will complete a contemporary media project that in the end will result in a CD, video, website, CD ROM or some other media related product that demonstrates the student’s talents and abilities, and could serve to help launch his/her career.

Requirements for degree completion: Normally two years will be needed to complete the coursework. Candidates will take a jury (jazz) during the first graduate year. The graduation recital (ESM 402) in the spring semester of the second year will include performance of written and improvised music that is determined by the student under the guidance of JCM faculty.

A performance emphasis of Lead/ Studio Trumpet is possible within the JCM degree. Because of the special skills required in this area, the candidate may elect to participate in orchestra, wind ensemble and chamber ensembles, in addition to the usual JCM course of study.

Writing Emphasis (JCW)

Prerequisites: Eastman baccalaureate or equivalent; exceptional improvisational skills; extensive jazz small group experience; two years of applied instruction on primary instrument; advanced study in jazz theory and improvisation. One year of jazz composition/arranging one year of non-jazz composition recommended.

Placement tests: Entering jazz students will be given placement tests in the music history, jazz theory, and functional jazz piano. Those students with deficiencies in these disciplines will be required to complete Music History Review, (MHS 119); Jazz Theory and Ear Training, (JCM 119); and Functional Jazz piano (JCM 205-206). Those credits are not included in the required credit hours for the degree.

Residency: one year of full-time study required. See section 05.01 (Residency) for more information.

Courses Credits
JCM 485-486 (Advanced Writing Projects)– 4 semesters @ 3 credits each 12
JCM 225 (Jazz Composition & Arranging III) 2
JCM 451-452 (Jazz Performance Workshop – 1 credit per semester) 2
ENS 400J1 (Large Jazz Ensemble) formerly JCM 400 2
MHS 414 (History of Jazz Styles) formerly JCM 441 (Advanced History and Analysis of Jazz Styles) 3
PED 406 (Graduate Jazz Pedagogy) formerly JCM 406 2
JCM 491-492 (Jazz Forum) 4 semesters 0
Electives2 8
JCM 4563 (Advanced Performance Projects-Contemporary Media) 0
ESM 402 (Recital): The recital represents work the student and his or her major applied music teacher have done together through registrations for study both before and concurrent with the time of the recital presentation. 0
Remedial courses – Please refer to 05.03 Orientation, Placement Examinations, and Remediation.
Total Credits 31
  1. The student must play in a large jazz ensemble every semester that s/he is in residence. After registering for 2 credits of ENS 400J, the student may opt to continue in ENS 400J and receive 1 credit per semester (up to a maximum of 4 credits), or register in ENS 401J for no credit.
  2. The student, in consultation with the advisor, will choose 8 additional hours of coursework depending on his/her background, needs, and interests. At least 2-3 hours of elective coursework must be from outside the JCM department. Elective courses must be numbered 200 or higher. Arts Leadership (ALC) courses do not count for elective credit. Writing skills majors are encouraged to elect orchestration, composition for non-majors, woodwind/brass/percussion methodology, or advanced composition courses that will directly benefit their composing and arranging skills. Electives may include up to six (6) credits of applied music study.
  3. Recognizing that jazz musicians, in particular, must be entrepreneurial, the candidate will complete a contemporary media project that in the end will result in a CD, video, website, CD ROM or some other media related product that demonstrates the student’s talents and abilities, and could serve to help launch his/her career.

Requirements for degree completion: Normally two years will be needed to complete the coursework. Candidates will take a jury (jazz) during the first graduate year. The graduation recital in the spring semester of the second year will include performance of original works and arrangements created by the student under the guidance of the writing skills faculty.

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06.02.08.01 MM – Major in Contemporary Media/Film Composition

Degree requirement checklist for MM in Contemporary Media/Film Composition

Prerequisites: Enrollment in an Eastman graduate program requires successful completion of an undergraduate degree at an accredited institution. Most successful applicants will have completed the bachelor of music degree, or the close equivalent of its core curriculum as part of another undergraduate degree program.

Upon entry to the program, master’s students take placement exams in music history, jazz theory, and functional piano. If remediation is required, the appropriate courses are taken, but their credit does not count towards the master’s degree program of study. The same is true of any English language instruction that is required.

Placement tests: Entering students will be given placement tests in the history of music, jazz theory, or traditional theory. Students with undergraduate jazz degrees take the JCM placement test; all others take the TH placement test. Those students with deficiencies in these disciplines will be required to complete Music History Review (MHS 119); Jazz Theory and Ear Training, (JCM 119); or Theory/Analysis/Musicianship Review I and II (TH 117-118). These credits are not included in the required credits for the degree.

Residency: At least one year of full-time study is required. See section 05.01 (Residency) for more information.

Courses Credits
JCM 475 (Writing Projects: Contemporary Media)– 2 semesters @ 3 credits each 6
JCM 476 (Writing Projects: Contemporary Media)– 2 semesters @ 3 credits each 6
JCM 433-434 (Film Scoring Techniques I and II) – 1 semester each @ 2 credits each 4
JCM 435  (Arranging for the Recording Studio) 2
JCM 454  (Contemporary Styles Composition) 2
JCM 455  (Composing for Digital Media) 2
ENS 400 or 400J (Graduate Ensemble)
2
MHS 416 (History and Analysis of Film Music) 2
JCM 436 (Video Game Scoring)
2
JCM 491-492 (Jazz Forum) 4 semesters 0
AME 460 – 4611 (Digital Programs and Programming I and II) – 1 semester each @ 2 credits each 4
CND 411 (Basic Conducting) 2
Electives2 2
ESM 4023 (Recital): The recital represents work the student and his or her major applied music teacher have done together through registrations for study both before and concurrent with the time of the recital presentation. 0
JCM 4564 (Advanced Performance Projects-Contemporary Media) 0
Remedial courses – Please refer to 05.03 Orientation, Placement Examinations, and Remediation.
Total Credits

36

  1. Audio and Music Engineering courses (AME) are offered through the River Campus at the University of Rochester.
  2. The student, in consultation with the advisor, will choose 2 additional hours of coursework depending on his/her background, needs, and interests. At least 2 hours of elective coursework must be from outside the JCM department. Elective courses must be numbered 200 or higher. Arts Leadership (ALC) courses do not count for elective credit. Neither primary nor secondary lessons maybe used as elective credit. Electives may include courses in music theory, composition, arranging, or other topics, as determined in consultation with the advisor.
  3. Normally two years will be needed to complete the coursework. Candidates will take a jury (jazz) during the first graduate year. The graduation recital in the spring semester of the second year will include performance of written and improvised music that is determined by the student under the guidance of JCM faculty.
  4. Recognizing that jazz musicians, in particular, must be entrepreneurial, the candidate will complete a contemporary media project that in the end will result in a CD, video, website, CD ROM or some other media related product that demonstrates the student’s talents and abilities, and could serve to help launch his/her career.

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06.02.09 MM – Major in Music Education

MM-Major in Music Education (Professional Studies)

Note: This is an appropriate degree program for those seeking New York State Professional Certification in Music.

Students who enrolled in their current MM degree program prior to summer 2009 are not affected by the updates indicated below. Please click here for degree requirements for students who enrolled in spring 2009 or earlier.

Degree Requirements for the MM in Music Education (Professional Studies) for students entering summer 2009 or later.

Prerequisites: Prerequisites for entrance to the program include a high standard of musicianship and scholarship, and a breadth of musical and general education. Previous experience in teaching is not required but is strongly recommended. An interview with a member of the music education faculty is scheduled, along with a skills assessment test. The MM degree is a performance-oriented degree, so all music education applicants must audition on their applied instrument or voice. Eastman’s applied music faculty evaluate these students on an equal footing with those who plan to major in Performance and Literature.

Upon entry to the program, master’s students take placement exams in music theory and history. If remediation is required, the appropriate courses are taken, but their credit does not count towards the master’s degree program of study. The same is true of any English language instruction that is required.

Residency: At least one year of full-time study required, except for students in the Summers-Only program (see below). See section 05.01 (Residency) for more information.

Courses Credits
MUE 402 (Measurement and Evaluation) 3
MUE 403 (Introduction to Research) 3

MUE 465 (Instrumental Techniques)–3 credits or MUE 466 Instr Tech: Strings
or
CND 423 (Advanced Conducting I: Choral)–2 credits or CND 424 (Advanced Conducting II: Choral)–2 credits

2-3
MUE 471 (Teaching Internship) 2
MUE 501 (History and Philosophy Seminar) 3
MUE 502 (Curriculum Seminar) 3
Applied Music Study (460A lessons) 8
Electives in theory, composition, or orchestration 3-4
Electives – Elective courses must be numbered 200 or higher. Arts Leadership (ALC) courses do not count for elective credit. The total number of ensembles and/or chamber music credits counted toward the degree may not exceed four (4). This restriction includes all ENS and CHB courses, required or elective, with the exception of repertoire courses.  Neither primary nor secondary lessons maybe used as elective credit. May include methods, music education, music history, theory, conducting, opera workshop (3 credit maximum), or education courses offered by the Warner School of Education, all to be selected in conference with the advisor. 3-4
Comprehensive Exam
Remedial courses – Please refer to 05.03 Orientation, Placement Examinations, and Remediation.
Total Credits 30-33

Jury: Typically, MM Students in Music Education must present a jury at the completion of 8 credits of applied study. In a few cases, the applied teacher will suggest that a recital should be presented in lieu of a jury.

MM MUE Summers-Only Program: Summers-only study is available for students admitted to the Master of Music in Music Education program. Normally, a Summers-Only student has full time employment as a music teacher and completes the majority of coursework for the degree during summer sessions. For those music teachers employed in the Rochester area, a limited number of courses may be completed in Fall and Spring semesters. For complete details please see: Music Education – Summers-Only Program

For the applied lesson requirement, two enrollments in 430A lessons for MM/MES students is equivalent to one enrollment in 460A lessons for MM/MUE students.

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06.02.09.01 MM – Major in Music Education (leading to New York State Initial plus Professional Certification in Music)

See also: 02.17 Teacher Certification in New York State

Students who enrolled in their current MM degree program prior to summer 2009 are not affected by the updates indicated below. Please click here for degree requirements for students who enrolled in spring 2009 or earlier.

Degree requirement checklist for the MM in Music Education (Initial plus Professional Certification – Instrumental) for students entering summer 2009 or later.

Degree requirement checklist for the MM in Music Education (Initial plus Professional Certification – Vocal) for students entering summer 2009 or later.

Degree requirement checklist for the MM in Music Education (Initial plus Professional Certification – General) for students entering summer 2009 or later.

Prerequisites: Prerequisites for entrance to the program include a high standard of musicianship and scholarship, and a breadth of musical and general education. Previous experience in teaching is not required but is strongly recommended. An interview with a member of the music education faculty is scheduled, along with a skills assessment test. The MM degree is a performance-oriented degree, so all music education applicants must audition on their applied instrument or voice. Eastman’s applied music faculty evaluate these students on an equal footing with those who plan to major in Performance and Literature.

Completion of an undergraduate degree in music (Bachelor of Music, Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Fine Arts, Bachelor of Science, or equivalent) is necessary for matriculation. In rare cases where the undergraduate degree was obtained in another field, the transcript must show the equivalent of 40 hours of music content area study in applied music lessons, ensemble participation, music theory and aural skills, music history, and keyboard.

Upon entry to the program, master’s students take placement exams in music theory and history. If remediation is required, the appropriate courses are taken, but their credit does not count towards the master’s degree program of study. The same is true of any English language instruction that is required.

Residency: This degree program may be pursued only through full-time enrollment. See section 05.01 (Residency) for more information.

Courses Credits
Pedagogical-Content Courses  
MUE 402 (Measurement and Evaluation) 3
MUE 403 (Introduction to Research) 3
MUE 501 (History and Philosophy of Music Education) 3
MUE 502 (Curriculum Seminar) 3
Other  
Applied Music Study (460A lessons) 8
Electives in Music Theory, Orchestration, and/or Composition1 3-4
Pedagogical Core (see below) 17-18
Comprehensive Exam
Remedial courses – Please refer to 05.03 Orientation, Placement Examinations, and Remediation.
Total Credits 40-42

1 Elective courses must be numbered 200 or higher. Arts Leadership (ALC) courses do not count for elective credit.

Jury: Typically, MM Students in Music Education must present a jury at the completion of 8 credits of applied study. In a few cases, the applied teacher will suggest that a recital should be presented in lieu of a jury.

Pedagogical Core: Instrumental Music Emphasis

Courses Credits
MUE 411 (Early Childhood Music Education) OR MUE 412 (Elementary General Music Methods) OR MUE 413 (Secondary General Music Methods) 2
MUE 419 (Secondary Instrumental Rehearsals: Winds/Perc) OR MUE 420 (Secondary Instrumental Rehearsals: Strings) 2
MUE 465 (Instrumental Techniques: Winds/Percussion) 3
MUE 466 (Instrumental Techniques: Strings) 3
ED 447 (Disability in Schools) 3
MUE 472 (Internship for Certification) 4
ESM 475 MUE Certification Workshop 0
Total Credits 17

Pedagogical Core: Vocal Music Emphasis

Courses Credits
MUE 412 (Elementary General Music Methods) 2
MUE 413 (Secondary General Music Methods) 2
MUE 414 (Elementary and Middle School Choral Methods) 2
MUE 415 (High School Choral Music) 2
MUE 465 (Instrumental Techniques: Winds/Percussion)  OR MUE 466 (Instrumental Techniques: Strings) 3
ED 447 (Disability in Schools) 3
MUE 472 (Internship for Certification) 4
ESM 475 MUE Certification Workshop 0
Total Credits 18

Pedagogical Core: General Music Emphasis

Courses Credits
MUE 411 (Early Childhood Music Education) 2
MUE 412 (Elementary General Music Methods) 2
MUE 413 (Secondary General Music Methods) 2
MUE 414 (Elementary and Middle School Choral Methods) 2
MUE 465 (Instrumental Techniques: Winds/Percussion)OR MUE 466 (Instrumental Techniques: Strings) 3
ED 447 (Disability in Schools) 3
MUE 472 (Internship for Certification) 4
ESM 475 MUE Certification Workshop 0
Total Credits 18

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06.02.10 MM – Major in Opera (Stage Directing)

Prerequisites: Candidates will demonstrate proficiency in stage-directing technique, musicianship, stage terminology, and language skills through an audition with the Eastman voice faculty and an interview with the opera faculty. Applicants must perform three vocal selections in three different languages (two from stage works), and direct students in a brief opera scene. If the applicant’s primary area of study is not music, then in addition to the audition s/he must provide evidence of scholarly work in their chosen field and present a portfolio of previous artistic and/or theatrical work.

Upon entry to the program, master’s students take placement exams in music theory and history. If remediation is required, the appropriate courses are taken, but their credit does not count towards the master’s degree program of study.

Residency: At least one year of full-time study is required. See section 05.01 (Residency) for more information.

Courses
Credits
MHS 480 (Bibliography)
2
Music History: one of the following: MHS 421 (Middle Ages), MHS 422 (Renaissance), MHS 423 (Baroque), MHS 424 (Classic period), MHS 425 (19th Cent.), MHS 426 (20th Cent.)
3
TH 400 (Analytical Techniques)
3
MHS/AH/FS/HIS/HUM (Music History and Humanities)3
3
OP 401, 402 (Seminar in Opera Stage Directing)
4
OP 416 (Advanced Opera Seminar)
2
OP 232 (Eastman Opera Theatre Practicum – Scenes) 3
OP 410 (Opera Production: Stage Management) 2
OP 490 (Opera Directing Project-independent study)1
3
Electives2 5
MM Listening Exam or pass MHS 435 Concert Repertoire with a grade of B- or better.
ESM 455 (Oral Examination)
Remedial courses – Please refer to 05.03 Orientation, Placement Examinations, and Remediation.
Total Credits
30

1 An Independent Study to prepare the student for their final directing project. To be taken in the last semester of the degree program in conjunction with his/her final directing project.

2 Elective courses must be numbered 200 or higher. Arts Leadership (ALC) courses do not count for elective credit. The total number of ensembles and/or chamber music credits counted toward the degree may not exceed four (4). This restriction includes all ENS and CHB courses, required or elective, with the exception of repertoire courses. Electives may include no more than six (6) credits of non-music courses. Up to four credits of applied music may be taken for elective credit. Elective courses may include: Opera Repertoire, Opera Workshop, Music History, and Advanced Opera Seminar, Voice Pedagogy, and Lyric Diction courses. Theater, Dance and Art History courses from the College of Arts and Sciences may also be taken. The faculty reserves the right to tailor the choice of elective(s) based on the needs of the student.

3 Recommended by advisor based on candidates’ interests or deficiencies. Courses might include: Specialized music history, art history, history, film study, performance practice, etc. 

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06.02.11 MM – Major in Performance and Literature

Students who enrolled in their current MM degree program prior to summer 2009 are not affected by the updates indicated below. Please click here for degree requirements for students who enrolled in spring 2009 or earlier.

Prerequisites:Candidates will demonstrate proficiency on their voice or instrument, and a hold bachelor of music degree or its equivalent.

Upon entry to the program, master’s students take placement exams in music theory and history. If remediation is required, the appropriate courses are taken, but their credit does not count towards the master’s degree program of study. The same is true of any English language instruction that is required.

Residency: At least one year of full-time study is required. See section 05.01 (Residency) for more information.

Remedial courses: Please refer to 05.03 Orientation, Placement Examinations, and Remediation.

Requirements in the various areas of study are indicated below:

1. CORE REQUIREMENTS (23-27 credits)

Applied Music – No more than sixteen (16) credits earned through private instrumental or vocal study may be used against the minimum of 36 credits required for the degree. Credits for major applied-music study are earned at the rate of four (4) credits for each semester of weekly one-hour lessons. No credit is granted for the degree-recital, but the student must be registered for applied-music study during the semester in which the recital is presented. All students in the MM PRL program are required to enroll for semesters of weekly one-hour lessons until the degree-recital is successfully presented. Students are expected to perform their degree recital in the third or fourth semester of the degree program. Students should also register for ESM 401 Master’s Degree Recital (0 credits) during the semester of their recital. Students majoring in performance and literature are not guaranteed more than four semesters of major applied-music study in their master’s degree programs. Any exceptions to these primary (1-hour) lesson limits require the permission of the Senior Associate Dean of Graduate Studies.

  • Primary Lessons – registration required through and including semester of recital
    • Piano, Organ and Voice majors must take four semesters (16 credits) of primary 1-hour lessons
    • All other instruments may either take
      • four semesters of primary 1-hour lessons (16 credits) OR
      • if the degree recital is completed during the third semester of the degree program, the student may choose to take only three semesters of primary lessons (12 credits). Selecting this option will increase the elective credits required for the degree by four (4) credits.
  • ESM 401 Master’s Degree Recital (0 credits)

Music History – At least eight (8) of the 36 required credits must be earned in Music History or Musicology courses. This normally includes the two-credit MHS 480 (Bibliography) course and two of the graduate “Period” courses from the MHS 421-426 sequence. Additional “Period” courses may be taken for elective credit. Based on graduate placement exam results, specific courses in this category may be recommended and/or required. Remedial courses – Please refer to 05.03 Orientation, Placement Examinations, and Remediation.

  • MHS 119 Historical Review1
  • MHS 480 Bibliography (2 credits)
  • Two of the following: (3 credits + 3 credits)

MHS 421: Music in the Middle Ages
MHS 422: Music in the Renaissance
MHS 423: Music in the Baroque
MHS 424: Music in the Classic Period
MHS 425: Music in the 19th Century
MHS 426: Music in the 20th Century

Music Theory – A one-semester course (TH 400 – Analytical Techniques-3 credits) is required of all students in the program. Students who received a bachelor’s degree from Eastman must take TH 401 Topics in Tonal Literature and Analysis (3 credits) instead of TH 400. Additional 400-level or 500-level Music Theory courses may be taken for elective credit. Remedial courses – Please refer to 05.03 Orientation, Placement Examinations, and Remediation.

  • TH 117 and/or 118 Theory, Analysis & Musicianship Review (for students who matriculate fall 2007 and thereafter)
  • TH 400 Analytical Techniques (3 credits)

2. COURSE REQUIREMENTS BY INSTRUMENT (9 credits)2

Ensemble – No more than four (4) credits earned through participation in the School’s various large and chamber ensembles may be used against the thirty-six (36) credits required for the degree. See section 06.01.02 (Ensemble Participation) for more information

  • Students who major in voice shall register for and participate in a choral ensemble for one semester during their first year of graduate study, that semester to be determined each year by the director of choral activities and the voice faculty. Voice students who do not need the credit to fulfill their degree requirements may register for no credit and no tuition charge. This requirement will be waived for students who received a bachelor’s degree from Eastman.
  • MM PRL pianists are required to accompany one singer and one instrumentalist during each semester of residence (up to and including four semesters). These pianists will be expected to find their own collaborative partners, with advice from their piano teachers if needed. This will include one rehearsal and one lesson per week with each partner. Recitals, juries, studio classes, and Eastman competitions may sometimes create a need for more intensive rehearsal. Recitalists and pianists should make reasonable adjustments for these events by mutual prior arrangement, but pianists will not be required to exceed more than eight hours of collaboration per month with each partner. Specific policies concerning professional standards and mutual expectations are outlined in a document entitled Collaborative Partnerships, which is published by the Accompanying Department. All students are encouraged to become familiar with the information in this document. All MM PRL pianists who receive graduate awards in accompanying will automatically meet this collaborative requirement by fulfilling the terms of their graduate award, and will not have any additional collaborative responsibilities.
  • All MM PRL candidates in strings and in winds, brass, and percussion must enroll for two semesters of ensemble during the first two semesters of their study at Eastman. Students who wish to participate for more than two semesters may register to participate in large ensembles for no credit and no charge. See section 06.01.02 (Ensemble Participation) for more information.
  • Guitarists are expected to present a special jury-performance of a complete concerto for the instrument.

Electives and Other requirements – The remaining nine to thirteen (9-13) credits that constitute the minimum total of thirty-six (36) are a combination of specified courses and elective credits that vary according to the student’s primary instrument. These requirements are detailed below. All elective credit must come from courses numbered 200 or higher, NONE MAY BE EARNED FOR APPLIED MUSIC STUDY, and no more than six (6) may be earned in courses which are not music courses. Arts Leadership (ALC) courses do not count for elective credit.

    •  Guitar
      • GTC 401 Guitar Studies-Fall (2 credits)
      • GTC 402 Guitar Studies-Spring (2 credits)

    •  Voice
      • Remedial Foreign Language1
      • CHB 431 Voice Repertoire (1 credit)
      • CHB 432 Voice Repertoire (1 credit)
      • Ensemble as assigned (2 credits)

    •  Organ
      • KBD 421 Organ Repertory I (2 credits)
      • KBD 422 Organ Repertory II (2 credits)
      • KBD 423 Organ Repertory III (2 credits)
      • KBD 424 Organ Repertory IV (2 credits)

    •  Harpsichord
      • KBD 407 Perf. & Lit. thru 18th Century (2 credits)
      • KBD 443 Keyboard Continuo Realization I (1 credit)
      • KBD 444 Keyboard Continuo Realization II (1 credit)

    •  Harp
      • PED 210 Harp Pedagogy (1 credit)
      • PED 211 Harp Pedagogy (1 credit)

  • All instruments
    • Additional elective credit(s) as needed to make degree total at least 36 credits.

Arts Leadership Course Policy for MM Student Matriculated in Fall 2007 or thereafter:

Graduate students are encouraged to explore courses offered in Eastman’s Arts Leadership program. Any 200-level ALC course that is cross-listed with a department (e.g., MUE 504/ALC 222) may be taken for MM degree credit and is subject to regular tuition charges.

Other ALC courses (400-level) may be elected by graduate students for non-degree credit free of charge. In such cases the ALP course may be used to bring the student to full-time status without incurring a tuition charge, but these courses do not fulfill graduate degree requirements.

Students who matriculated into their current master’s degree program prior to fall 2007 may still take any ALC course at the 200-level for elective credit toward their degree. Approved by Graduate Professional Committee 2/7/2007. See section 06.02.04 (MM Elective Course Restrictions) for more information.

3. NON-CREDIT REQUIREMENTS

  • Residency: one year of full-time study required.
  • MM Listening Requirement: See section 06.02.03 (MM Listening Test) for more information.
  • Jury: Each student in the Master of Music degree-program in Performance and Literature must perform an official jury examination before receiving the degree. Normally, students in this program are expected to take the jury during their first year of residency at Eastman. Juries are held in December and April: consult your departmental chair for the exact dates of the juries in a given year. If the jury is taken during the first year of graduate study, this does not preclude the opportunity to take a second jury during a subsequent year of degree-study. Jury examinations for all students are requested by their major applied teachers, but it is the responsibility of each student in the MM/PRL program to see to it that s/he presents at least one jury examination before completing the degree program. See section 06.01.03 (Graduate Juries) for more information.
  • Oral Examination: The Oral Examination (ESM 455) is administered by the student’s major applied department and normally is taken before and is concerned primarily with the student’s degree-recital. It is the student’s responsibility to inform the chair of his or her major applied department of the date of his or her degree-recital, as soon as that date is established with the Concert Office. In consultation with the student’s major applied teacher, the chair will then determine the membership of the student’s oral examination committee and the date and time of the examination, and will report that information to the Department Secretary. The principal subject of the Oral Examination is determined by the student’s major applied teacher. As mentioned above, this subject normally is some aspect of the student’s degree-recital. However, at the discretion of the major applied teacher, it may be some other topic relevant to the student’s performance area. AT LEAST TWO WEEKS BEFORE THE EXAMINATION, the major applied teacher will inform the student of the principal subject of the examination, and the student will prepare a 10-15 minute presentation on the subject for the first part of the examination. The remaining portion of the examination will consist of questioning by the examiners on the subject of the presentation or on other topics related to the subject or to the student’s recital. At the request of the student or his/her major applied teacher, one member of the Oral Examination committee may be from outside the department, such substitution being called for when the principal subject of the examination makes it appropriate. The chair of the examining committee will be appointed by the chair of the student’s major applied department and will be someone other than the student’s major applied teacher.
  • Degree Recital: One full-length solo recital is required of all candidates for the master’s degree in performance and literature. The student must register for 1-hour applied lessons each semester until the recital has been successfully completed. The recital is to be prepared under the guidance of the student’s major applied teacher, and the student must be registered for 1-hour applied lesson instruction with that teacher during the semester in which the recital is presented. The recital represents work the student and his or her major applied music teacher have done together through registrations for study both before and concurrent with the time of the recital presentation. These recitals normally comprise at least fifty minutes of music and demonstrate the student’s ability to perform solo literature on an advanced level. At least two evaluators will attend the recital: the student’s major applied teacher and at least one of the teacher’s departmental colleagues. Both of these persons must approve the recital, and it is the student’s responsibility to schedule the recital when all required evaluators can attend. Some departments require more than two evaluators to attend the recital; students should check with their applied teachers to make sure that the scheduling and evaluation of their recitals follow departmental procedures. The recital is to be scheduled in such a manner, also, that the oral examination can take place before the recital occurs. No degree-mandated recitals may occur after the last day of classes of either semester. Thus, students scheduling their recitals at the end of the spring term should assume that their oral examinations will take place before jury week. All arrangements for the recital are to be made by the student. Information concerning scheduling and other responsibilities of the student in connection with the recital are found in the booklet, “Student Recital Handbook,” available from the Concert Office. MM PRL students must register for ESM 401 in the semester in which they plan to give their recital. There is no cost for recital registration, and no credit is awarded. A grade of “S” is recorded when the recital is passed. The results of the degree recital will be submitted to the departmental chair, who forwards the grade to the Registrar. Students who intend to graduate at the end of the semester in which they present their degree recital should plan to play their recital no later than the last day of classes.

Footnotes:

1 Voice students must demonstrate proficiency in French, German, and Italian. Upon matriculation, student transcripts will be evaluated for evidence of foreign language study. If the student does not possess the necessary degree of proficiency, s/he will be required to pass the first semester of a freshman-level language course with a grade of B or higher.

2 Four (4) credit combined maximum for ensembles (ENS) and chamber music (CHB) courses not including repertoire courses, six (6) credit maximum for non-music courses. All courses must numbered at the 200-level or higher. Arts :eadersjo[ Neither primary applied music instruction beyond sixteen (16) credits, nor any applied secondary music instruction count toward the elective requirement.

MM Degree Checklist:

It is the student’s obligation to see to it that s/he has completed all requirements for the degree. Have you . . .

      1. removed all deficiencies revealed by the initial placement examinations?
      2. completed at least 16 credits (for piano, organ and voice) or 12 credits (all other instruments) of primary applied lessons?
      3. taken the Bibliography course (MHS 480) or its equivalent?
      4. taken at least two “period” courses in Music History at the 400-level (including any that were required on the basis of your placement examination?)
      5. taken TH 400 or equivalent?
      6. passed the MM Listening Exam or earned a grade of B- or better in MHS 435 Concert Repertoire: Museum or Living Art?
      7. passed the Oral Examination? If so, does Registrar have results?
      8. presented a satisfactory degree recital? If so, has Registrar received the signed recital program?
      9. removed any language deficiencies (singers only)?
      10. had transcripts sent to the Registrar’s office to document any transfer credit?
      11. resolved any grades of “I” (Incomplete)?
      12. maintained continuous enrollment throughout your degree program?
      13. submitted a Degree Application form to the Registrar’s Office to signal your intent to graduate?

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06.02.11.01 Woodwinds Specialist (MM Performance & Literature)

Students who enrolled in their current MM degree program prior to summer 2009 are not affected by the updates indicated below. Please click here for degree requirements for students who enrolled in spring 2009 or earlier.

Degree requirement checklist for MM in Performance and Literature – Woodwind Specialist for students entering summer 2009 or later.

Through the performance and literature major, a student may develop as a woodwinds specialist. Prerequisites for this program are the same as those for other students admitted to the performance and literature major, except that the applicant must present the entrance audition on both the major and secondary major instruments. In addition to the courses in music history and theory taken by all students majoring in performance and literature, the candidate in woodwinds also will enroll for the following in place of the elective courses: a minimum of two semesters of study of the major instrument (460A lessons), the secondary major instrument (460 lessons), and each of three secondary minor instruments (430 lessons). Students must also complete two semesters of ensemble, full recitals on the major and secondary instruments, an oral exam prior to the recital on the major instrument, as well as a performance or a less formal recital of a sonata or equivalent work on each of the secondary minor instruments. The minimum total semester hours in the woodwinds program is 36.

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06.02.12 MM – Major in Piano Accompanying and Chamber Music

Students who enrolled in their current MM degree program prior to summer 2009 are not affected by the updates indicated below. Please click here for degree requirements for students who enrolled in spring 2009 or earlier.

Degree requirement checklist for MM in Piano Accompanying and Chamber Music for students entering summer 2009 or later.

Prerequisites: Prerequisites for this degree include a bachelor of music degree or its equivalent, with a major in piano performance or accompanying, and language proficiency equivalent to one year of college-level instruction in French, German, or Italian.

Upon entry in the program, MM students in ACM take the placement exams in music theory and history required of all entering graduate students at Eastman. If remediation is required, the appropriate courses are taken, but their credit does not count toward the master’s degree program of study. The same is true of any English language instruction that is required.

Residency: Two academic years of full-time residency are required, except under extraordinary circumstances. See section 05.01 (Residency) for more information.

Courses Credit
ACM 460A (accompanying lessons – 4 semesters at 4 credits each.) 16
CHB 401 (Instrumental Sonata and Duo Repertoire) 2
VCC 402 (Voice Repertoire for Pianists) 2
ACY 415, 416, 417 and 418 (English, French, German, and Italian Lyric Diction), or pass relevant Lyric Diction Exams Students who choose to demonstrate lyric diction proficiency by examination are exempt from the course requirement but must replace the credit(s) with elective credit. 4
TH 475 (Intermediate Keyboard Skills) or TH 476 (Advanced Keyboard Skills) 3
TH 400 (Analytical Techniques) – students who received a bachelor’s degree from Eastman must take TH 401 instead of TH 400 3
MHS 480 (Bibliography) 2
One of the following: MHS 421 (Middle Ages), MHS 422 (Renaissance), MHS 423 (Baroque), MHS 424 (Classic period), MHS 425 (19th Cent.), MHS 426 (20th-21st Centuries) 3
Electives 1-2
MM Listening Exam or pass MHS 435 Concert Repertoire with a grade of B- or better.
Jury – normally taken in December, at the end of the first semester of study.

Foreign Language Proficiency (See MM Accompanying Handbook, pages 6 and 7.)

A. Within their first year at the Eastman School, all MM and DMA Accompanying majors are normally expected to pass a language comprehension examination (written translation) in French, German or Italian.

B. In addition, all students must demonstrate proficiency in lyric diction through one of the following means:

1.) Successfully complete Eastman’s vocal diction courses in English, French, German, and Italian (ACY 415, ACY 416, ACY 417 and ACY 418) with a grade of B or higher in each of those courses, or

2.) Demonstrate lyric diction proficiency by an oral examination as outlined below, or

3.) Provide a transcript showing that lyric diction courses have been taken previously and that the student received a grade of B or higher in each of those courses.

C If with a second attempt a student has been unable to pass any of these language examinations, s/he will be required to take and pass (with a grade of B or higher) the 101G – 102G language courses offered by the ESM Humanities Department, or the equivalent courses elsewhere.

Remedial courses – Please refer to 05.03 Orientation, Placement Examinations, and Remediation.
Total Credits 36-37

Additional requirements:

      • Degree Recitals: Majors in piano accompanying and chamber music will present two recitals: one with a vocalist or vocalists (ESM 405), the other with an instrumentalist or instrumentalists (ESM 406).
      • Oral Exam: Students must pass an oral examination (ESM 455) administered by the major department before completion of the degree program. The candidate will arrange the scheduling of the oral examination through his or her department chair before one or the other of the candidate’s degree recitals. The oral examination will focus on the upcoming recital and related matters.

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06.03 The Doctor of Musical Arts Degree

The Doctor of Musical Arts (DMA) degree is designed to represent high attainments in the practice of music, with emphasis on the arts of performing, composing/arranging, conducting and teaching. A candidate for this degree must be, first of all, a capable practitioner of a chosen art. He or she must also demonstrate intellectual attributes of high order. Only those who meet rigorous standards in musical performance and scholarship will be accepted for candidacy.

Graduate students occasionally are admitted to a doctoral program having earned only a bachelor’s degree. More commonly, however, a graduate student will have earned a master’s degree either at the Eastman School of Music or elsewhere before being admitted as a doctoral student. Additional prerequisites can be found with the degree requirements for each major.

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06.03.01 Continuation from MM to DMA Degree

Some students enrolled in the Master of Music program consider continuation of Eastman study through enrollment in the Doctor of Musical Arts program. Such students should discuss this possibility with their department faculty (and/or major applied teacher) and should consider very carefully in this context the ease (or difficulty) with which they have been able to handle their master’s-degree coursework. They should feel encouraged to at least begin the application process if their department faculty members support this plan and if their grades in music history and theory courses are largely “A” or “A-.” Experience has shown that students whose “classroom” grades in the master’s degree are consistently in the “B” range either are not admitted to the DMA program or, if they are, have severe difficulty with doctoral seminars, research projects, and the doctoral examinations.

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06.03.02 List of Majors within the DMA Degree

The following majors are offered within the Doctor of Musical Arts degree program:

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06.03.03 Residency & Time Limits (DMA)

The curriculum for the doctor of musical arts degree will normally require 90 semester hours beyond the bachelor’s degree or 60 hours beyond an acceptable master’s degree.

Students are required to be in residence either one or two years, depending on their major. Please refer to the degree requirements below for each major for specific residency requirements. Full-time residence is defined as two consecutive semesters exclusively devoted to graduate work. During this period the student must obtain credit for at least 24 semester hours of work, except for one holding an assistantship, who must register for at least 18 semester hours.

Graduate students occasionally are admitted to a doctoral program having earned only a bachelor’s degree. More commonly, however, a graduate student will have earned a master’s degree at the Eastman School of Music or elsewhere before being admitted as a doctoral candidate.

Students in the DMA degree program are expected to complete all work leading to the degree within seven years following the bachelor’s degree or within six years following the master’s degree. Students who are unable to finish their program within these time limits may request an extension of time from the Graduate Professional Committee. Such requests should explain the circumstances which have caused the need for the extension. Such extension, if granted, will be of limited duration.

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06.03.04 Remedial Courses (DMA)

Remedial courses that are required as a result of the placement exams or upon admission to a program must be taken above and beyond the 60-credit hours required for the DMA. Required remediation in the following courses must be taken as additional credits to the sixty-credit program of study. Please see section 05.03 (Placement Examinations and Remediation) for further information.

Required remedial courses for DMA students may include:

      • For students who enrolled prior to fall 2007: Review Dictation (TH 115) and/or Form and Analysis Review (TH 116)
      • Theory, Analysis and Musicianship Review (TH 117 and/or TH 118 [must be passed with a grade of B+ or higher]).
      • Music History Review (MHS 119)
      • Bibliography (MHS 480)
      • Basic Jazz Theory & Aural Skills (JCM 119) – Jazz majors only
      • Foreign Language Review courses (when applicable)
      • Courses from the MHS 420 sequence
      • English for Academic Purposes (when applicable)
      • Any 100-level course

In addition, a counterpoint course (TH 451 or 452) or style composition course (TH 480) may be required for some students based on results of the placement exam.  In these cases, TH 451, 452, or 480 will count toward the theory requirement as the elective third course to be taken along with TH 401 and 402.

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06.03.05 Program of Study – General Information (DMA)

Students who enrolled in their current MM or DMA degree program prior to summer 2009 are not affected by the credit changes indicated in the following sections. Please click here for degree requirements for students who enrolled in spring 2009 or earlier.

The program of study lists those courses for which the student will receive graduate credit. Individual programs of study may vary considerably, depending upon the needs of the student, as revealed in the placement tests in theory and music history, general educational background, and career goals, but each student’s program normally will comprise at least 60 credits beyond the master’s degree.

Specific requirements for each major are outlined in the following sections. Instructions for preparing the program of study are available from the Graduate Studies Office web site.

The program of study must be approved first by the student’s program advisor and then by the Graduate Professional Committee (GPC). Programs of study must receive approval of the Graduate Professional Committee by the student’s third semester of study (or after 20 credit hours have been taken). Deadlines for submission of agenda items to the Graduate Professional Committee are published on the Graduate Calendar. The program of study must be approved by the GPC at least for months before the student takes the doctoral comprehensive exam.

When approved by the Graduate Professional Committee, the program of study constitutes the formal requirements that must be met by the student before completion of work for the degree. Once the program of study has been approved, any subsequent changes must be resubmitted to the GPC for approval following the same procedure described above.

Electives within the DMA Program of Study

The following restrictions apply to all DMA programs of study. Additional restrictions for some majors are also indicated with the individual requirements for those majors.

  • Ensemble Courses: Without explicit permission from the Graduate Professional Committee, no more than four credits earned through ensemble courses may be included in the DMA program of study.
  • MHS 421-426: DMA students may take only one MHS 42x course (as part of the minor, or as elective credit) within the 60-credit degree program. Other MHS 42x courses may be required as remediation, or elected above and beyond the 60-credit limit. Exceptions to this policy must be approved by the GPC.
  • Arts Leadership Curriculum (ALC) Policy for DMA students who matriculated in Fall 2006 or thereafter:
    • Graduate students are encouraged to explore courses offered in Eastman’s Arts Leadership program. Any ALC course that is cross-listed with a department (e.g., MUE 504/ALC 222) may be taken for degree credit and is subject to regular tuition charges.
    • Other ALC courses (400-level) may be elected by graduate students for non-degree credit free of charge. In such cases the ALP course may be used to bring the student to full-time status without incurring a tuition charge, but these courses do not fulfill graduate degree requirements.
    • Students who matriculated into their current DMA degree program prior to fall 2006 may still take any ALC course at the 200-level for elective credit toward their degree.
  • Students may take up to a maximum of six credits of secondary applied music lessons (460 or 430). Primary applied music lessons (460A or 430A) do not count as elective credit.

Minors within the DMA Program of Study

Some majors within the DMA degree will include one or more minor areas of concentration as part of their program of study. Any such minor field must receive approval of the Graduate Professional Committee along with the program of study. To declare a minor field, a student must take a minimum of three courses totaling at least eight credits in an area of their choosing. The minor field may occasionally involve applied-music study in a secondary instrument or voice; in such cases, a maximum of six credit hours of applied-music study may apply towards the minor. Some departments, listed below, have defined specific criteria for a minor field in their discipline:

Requirements for a minor in Music History:

A minor field in music history comprises four courses from the music history and/or musicology listings. All four courses must be at the 400-level or above and at least two must be at the doctoral level (500 and above).

Requirements for a minor in Composition:

A student wishing to minor in composition must receive explicit permission to do so from the composition department. Such permission is granted only on the basis of review by that department of three or four works by the student. The minor will be a course of study assembled by the faculty, which will consist of a minimum of twelve credit hours. Of these twelve credits, there must be two semesters of composition study with a faculty composition teacher. Other courses from the offerings of the composition department will be determined according to the particular needs and abilities of the student seeking this minor.

Requirements for a minor in Pedagogy:

DMA students who wish to create a minor area in Pedagogy may draw from courses relevant to their interests, including, but not limited to, various courses from the Music Education department, Pedagogy of Theory (TH 421), Organ Pedagogy (PED 239), Piano Pedagogy (PED 461/462), Voice Pedagogy (PED 481), Principles of String Playing and Teaching (PED 285/286) and/or an independent study course. Often, a student’s interest in a Pedagogy minor begins with participation in MUE 504: Preparing Future Music Faculty. Eastman has no “department of pedagogy.” Students who wish to create a minor in Pedagogy are encouraged to consult with the Professor of MUE 504 for advice and guidance in preparing an appropriate program of study. Such programs of study must ultimately receive the approval of the Graduate Professional Committee.

Requirements for a minor in Music Education:

To be considered for a minor in music education the DMA student must:

1) Take the department’s musicianship skills test and have the test reviewed by at least 2 music education faculty members.

2) Present evidence of his/her music teaching, which can be in the form of a video recording or live teaching demonstration. The DMA student may present evidence of teaching to an individual, small group, or large ensemble/class, and the learners may be children or adults. This evidence of teaching must be reviewed by at least 2 music education faculty members.

3) Interview with the music education faculty member whose expertise is a close match for the DMA student’s interests.

If the music education faculty agree that the DMA student is a good candidate for a minor area of study, one faculty member will advise the student about which courses are appropriate in his/her course of study. The minor in Music Education consists of at least 8 credits of graduate level (400 or 500 level) courses with an MUE prefix.

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06.03.06 Lecture Recital (DMA)

The lecture recital is, in a very real sense, the culmination of the Doctor of Musical Arts degree program in that it requires the student to bring to bear his or her accumulated skills and knowledge on a presentation demonstrating an ideal synthesis of performance and scholarship. The following statement of policy is intended to aid the student in the preparation of this event.

Developing the Topic

The lecture-recital topic may include performance and analysis, performance practice, pedagogy, editions, new music, or other areas of the student’s interest. Students are encouraged to develop their lecture recital topic out of research begun in a course in jazz and contemporary media, music education, music history, musicology, or music theory, an independent study, or a doctoral research project, though the topic may be unrelated to such enrollments.

The student should prepare the lecture recital for a target audience of his/her peers and colleagues. It should be of a caliber appropriate for presentation at a college or university job interview or at a meeting of a national professional organization (such as the College Music Society or the Music Teachers National Association.)

Format for the Presentation

The basic format is normally a lecture illustrated by brief performance excerpts, followed by a complete performance of the work(s) being discussed. It is expected that the lecture recital will last approximately one hour, including a few minutes at the end for questions from those in attendance. Of this time, not more than thirty minutes may be used for a complete performance of the work(s) being presented. Students are expected to attend lecture recitals throughout their doctoral studies in order to familiarize themselves with various possible formats that might be appropriate for their own topic.

Faculty Advisors

The student shall have two faculty co-advisors who will work with the student on the preparation of the lecture recital, attend the event, and participate in the evaluation of it. The first advisor is the student’s primary applied teacher, and the second is chosen typically, but not exclusively, from the jazz and contemporary media, music education, musicology, or music theory faculties. It is the student’s responsibility to maintain regular contact with the project’s co-advisors throughout the preparation of the lecture recital. It is expected that the student will know the material well enough by the time of the lecture recital to be able to present it from notes or a topical outline. However, the co-advisors may require the student to write out the entire lecture portion to help ensure a coherent and well-organized presentation.

Submitting the Proposal

At least two months prior to the projected date of the lecture recital, the student must complete a proposal, including the date, time, and place of lecture recital. The proposal must be approved by the two faculty co-advisors. The signatures of these two faculty members indicate their approval of the proposal and their willingness to work with the student as co-advisors on the preparation of the lecture recital, to attend the event, and to participate in the evaluation of it.

The student shall then submit the signed proposal of the lecture recital to the Senior Associate Dean of Graduate Studies at least two months in advance of the recital. The Senior Associate Dean then designates a third faculty member who will join the co-advisors to form the committee that will evaluate the presentation. The third committee member for piano performance majors will be a member of the piano faculty, designated by the chair of that department. Lecture-recital proposals from piano performance majors should thus be submitted to the piano department secretary.

Recital Registration

Students are required to register for Lecture Recitals much as they would register for other classes. Students should register for ESM 503 Doctoral Lecture Recital. There is no charge for this registration, and a faculty signature is not required. Students may add or drop their recital registration online, or by completing a “Schedule Change Request” form in the Registrar’s Office. No penalty will be assessed for late recital registration, which is permitted at any time. Once reported by the student’s department chair as approved, the recital will appear on the official transcript with a grade of “S” for satisfactory. The evaluating committee will also inform the student of the outcome of his/her lecture-recital after it is concluded. If necessary, a lecture recital may be repeated one time. (revised 6/28/06)

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06.03.07 Comprehensive Exam & Candidacy (DMA)

Before completing the degree, all students the Doctor of Musical Arts program must pass the comprehensive examination and must demonstrate to their major department(s) and the Graduate Professional Committee that they have attained broad competency as practitioners of music.

The comprehensive examination will consist of a written examination in the fields of music history, literature, and theory, and an oral examination of a broad nature covering the student’s major field of study, and minor (where applicable). Students must pass the written portion of the exam before taking the oral exam, but once the written portion is passed, the oral exam must occur within the same academic term. In addition, scheduled dates for the oral exam are firm commitments on the part of the student, as well as the faculty, and may be altered only under extraordinary circumstances and upon approval of the Senior Associate Dean of Graduate Studies.

For students who entered their doctoral degree program prior to fall 2009, the written exam consists of four parts: I – identification of terms, people, etc.; II – essays(s); III – analysis and skills; and IV – score identification. Jazz and Contemporary Media (JCM) majors are required to take a jazz-based Part III in lieu of Part III of the standard exam (analysis and skills).

Students who enter their doctoral degree program in fall 2009 or later will not be required to take the theory skills section of part III of the exam. DMA Theory Skills Exam will instead be given as a placement exam during orientation week. See section 05.03 (Placement Examinations and Remediation) for further information.

Students will be required to complete the comprehensive exam on a computer using standard word processing software. Students will not be allowed to hand write any portion of the exam, except for answers requiring musical notation. Any exceptions to this policy must be approved by the Senior Associate Dean of Graduate Studies.

The committee of examiners for the comprehensive examination will normally consist of at least four faculty members.

Students who will not be writing a dissertation or doctoral research project will sit for the comprehensive examination after the following have been completed:

      • all academic coursework of the degree
      • language exams, if applicable
      • at least two of the performance requirements
      • departmental jury, if applicable

Students who will submit a full dissertation to satisfy the requirements of the degree must pass the comprehensive examination at least six months before submitting the final document and scheduling the oral defense. A student in this category will not be considered a candidate for the degree or permitted to begin work on the dissertation until he or she has passed the comprehensive examination.

If a student fails the comprehensive examination, she or he may not retake it until five calendar months have elapsed. The exam may only be taken a third time with the permission of the Graduate Professional Committee.

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06.03.08 Dissertation/Doctoral Research Project

Students in the Doctor of Musical Arts degree program may elect to write a doctoral research project or dissertation in partial fulfillment of their degree requirements. Students who are interested in preparing a dissertation or doctoral research project must first consult with the chair of the Musicology department to establish the student’s ability to accomplish independent research and to write effectively in English, as well as to discuss the feasibility of the project. Once approval from the Musicology department chair is obtained, the student will work with his or her faculty co-advisors to craft a dissertation or doctoral research project proposal; this is normally submitted to the Graduate Professional Committee for approval along with the program of study. Students who write a dissertation or doctoral research project that does not involve work in music history will be required to take a total of 9 credits of MHS 590 courses, 6 credits of which will count within their research and writing component of the degree, and 3 credits of which will count in the elective category.

Ordinarily, the dissertation or doctoral research project must be written in residence. In any case, it must be written under the supervision of the candidate’s advisor and, when completed, must be approved by him or her and by at least two other faculty readers.

Please refer to the Graduate Calendar for submission deadlines. One final electronic copy of the dissertation is to be submitted for deposit in Sibley Music Library. Students submitting a dissertation should also submit one final unbound paper copy. The student should also prepare an additional copy for personal use, and check with their department for any additional submission requirements.

For dissertation work during summer session, please see section 07.03.07 (Dissertation and Final Examination).

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06.03.09 DMA – Major in Composition

Prerequisites: Prerequisites for the DMA in Composition include a master’s degree in composition or a related field. Before entrance, the composition department reviews the submitted materials consisting of compositions and recordings, transcripts, letters of reference, and scholarly writings (masters-level papers).

Upon entry to the program, students take placement exams in music theory and history. If remediation is required, the appropriate courses are taken, but their credit does not count towards the degree. The same is true of any English-language instruction and/or instruction in bibliography that is required.

Residency: At least one year of full-time study is required. See section 05.01 (Residency) for more information.

Requirement Credits
Composition CMP 401, 402, 501, 502 (Advanced Composition I-IV) CMP 501 and CMP 502 may be repeated for credit in place of CMP 401 and CMP 402 12
Applied music study (460 – 3 credits per semester)Three semesters minimum, two of which must be consecutive. 9-12

Research and Writing Seminars

  • Three MHS 590 courses (3 credits each) and
  • One CMP 591 or CMP 592 Composition Research Seminar (3 credits).

Other substitutions require approval from the student’s advisor and the Graduate Professional Committee.

12

Theory and Compositional Practice Complete the following three courses for a total of 9 credits:

  • TH 401 (Topics in Tonal Literature & Analysis) – 3 credits
  • CMP 412 (Compositional Practice circa 1925-1955) – 3 credits
  • CMP 413 (Compositional Practice circa 1955-1980) – 3 credits

With special permission of the theory department chair, TH 511 may be substituted for TH 401.

9
CMP 596 (DMA Dissertation Project)For the dissertation, the student must create an original composition of acceptable depth, sophistication, and professionalism that is prepared with the guidance of the dissertation advisor. 8
Electives/Minor Field The student, in consultation with the advisor, will incorporate into his/her program of study 7-10 elective credits. Composition and applied-music courses will not count towards this requirement, with the exception of CMP 421 and CMP 422. Most often, these credits will be in music history or theory courses, although other options are possible. Theory courses must be numbered 401 or higher for program credit. See section 06.03.05 (Program of Study – DMA) for additional restrictions on electives. 7-10
Remedial courses – Please refer to 05.03 Orientation, Placement Examinations, and Remediation.
Total Credits 60

Jury: Juries are required for DMA composition students in order to ratify their applied music studies, and shall be performed as specified by the department of the student’s primary instrument.

Foreign Language: There is no foreign language requirement for this major, except in those instances where the knowledge of a foreign language is essential to research or other work in a specific field.

Doctoral Recitals: Two recitals are required comprising works by the composer and works performed by the composer on his or her major instrument. In this last category, a standard work, either twentieth century or pre-twentieth century is required. Students may conduct as part of the recital program, but conducting alone does not satisfy the instrumental or vocal performance requirement. Students will register for these recitals during the semester that they occur as follows: ESM 501 (First Doctoral Recital); ESM 502 (Second Doctoral Recital). A lecture recital is not required for students in this major.

Comprehensive Examinations: Required. Please see section 06.03.07 (Comprehensive Examinations – DMA) for further information.

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06.03.10 DMA – Major in Conducting

Emphasis: Conducting majors will declare an emphasis for their studies in one of the following areas: literature and performance of (1) orchestral music, (2) choral music, or (3) wind ensemble music, and will concentrate on that specialization. A substantial portion of time also will be devoted to conducting in areas other than one’s principal repertoire. A feature of the conducting program is regular tutorial sessions in conjunction with a significant amount of contact with the School’s ensembles.

Prerequisites: Candidates must have significant professional experience as performers and conductors.

Upon entry to the program, students take placement exams in music theory and history. If remediation is required, the appropriate courses are taken, but their credit does not count towards the degree. The same is true of any English-language instruction that is required and any instruction in bibliography that is needed.

Residency: For conducting majors, two years beyond the master’s degree must be in full-time residence. See section 05.01 (Residency) for more information.

Requirement Credits
CND 541-544 (DMA Conducting I-IV) – 4 semesters 16
CND 441-444 (Colloquy in Conducting) – 4 semesters 2

Research and Writing Seminars

  • Consisting of one of the following: (A) four MHS 590s (B) three MHS 590s plus one of the following: TH 481, TH 482, TH 581, TH 582, TH 590, MUY 400- or 500-level course, or independent study at the 500 level (major document required) (C) two MHS 590s (6 credits) plus a doctoral research project1 – (6 credits) (D) Dissertation1 – (12 credits)
12

Theory Complete the following three courses for a total of 9 credits:

  • TH 401 (Topics in Tonal Literature & Analysis) – 3 credits,
  • TH 402 Topics in Twentieth-Century Literature & Analysis (3 credits) and
  • One additional graduate-level theory course of the student’s choice. (3 credits) TH 400 may not be used.

With special permission of the theory department chair, TH 511 may be substituted for TH 401 and/or TH 513 may be substituted for TH 402.

9

Electives

  • If the student elects to complete a doctoral research project that does not involve work in music history, then at least six credit hours of MHS coursework are required in the elective category.
  • MHS 421-426: DMA students may take only one MHS 42x course (as part of the minor, or as elective credit) within the 60-credit degree program. Other MHS 42x courses may be required as remediation, or elected above and beyond the 60-credit limit. Exceptions to this policy must be approved by the GPC.
  • Electives may include up to 6 credit hours of applied music lessons.
  • May also include a minor area of concentration. See section 06.03.05 (Program of Study) for more information.
21
Remedial courses – Please refer to 05.03 Orientation, Placement Examinations, and Remediation.
ESM 508: Public Performance and Lecture Recital
Total Credits 60

1 If option C or D is chosen, the student must submit a proposal to the Graduate Professional Committee. The Graduate Committee will vote on the proposal. At least one member of this faculty committee will be from the music education, musicology, or music theory departments. In addition, if option C or D is chosen and the doctoral research project/dissertation does not involve work in music history, then students will be required to take a total of 9 credits of MHS 590 courses, 6 credits of which will count within their research and writing component of the degree, and 3 credits of which will count in the elective category. See section 06.03.08 (Doctoral Dissertation/Research Project) for additional information.

Foreign Language: Choral and orchestral conducting students should have foreign language proficiency equivalent to two years of undergraduate study in French, Italian, or German. The degree of proficiency will be tested upon matriculation. If the student does not possess the necessary degree of proficiency, a foreign language will be a mandatory part of the student’s curriculum until it is attained. If students pass a fourth semester language course (e.g. FR 202G or GER 202G) with a B+ or higher, their language requirement is fulfilled. On the recommendation of the chair and the approval of the Graduate Dean, up to two credits in a required foreign language at the 200-level or higher may be used for degree credit.There is no language requirement for wind conducting students. 

Assessment of Language Competency for Doctoral Students

Comprehensive Examinations: Required. See section 06.03.07 (Comprehensive Examinations – DMA) for more information.

Public Performance: Conducting students must present one or more public performances of repertoire in the candidate’s field of emphasis. A level of professional proficiency is required.

Lecture Recital: The lecture recital is to be presented in a rehearsal at least two weeks prior to the public performance described above. A proposal for the lecture recital must be approved by the Senior Associate Dean of Graduate Studies at least two months prior to the projected date of the lecture recital. The student will register for ESM 503 (Doctoral Lecture Recital) during the semester that the lecture recital is presented. DMA students majoring in conducting will follow the same lecture-recital procedures as DMA PRL students. The student will student will choose two faculty co-advisors to serve on their lecture-recital committee; the third member will be appointed by the Senior Associate Dean of Graduate Studies after a formal lecture-recital proposal is submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies. See section 06.03.06 (Lecture Recital – DMA) for additional information.

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06.03.11 DMA – Major in Early Music (Emphasis in Historical Plucked Instruments)

Students who enrolled in their current DMA degree program prior to summer 2009 are not affected by the updates indicated below. Please click here for degree requirements for students who enrolled in spring 2009 or earlier.

Prerequisites: An audition that demonstrates high achievement in performance is required of all applicants to the DMA in Early Music program. In addition, applicants demonstrate their ability to write by submitting a scholarly paper, and they demonstrate their academic credentials by submitting a transcript of all previous collegiate-level coursework.

Upon entry in the program, students take the placement exams in music theory and history required of all entering graduate students at Eastman. If remediation is required, the appropriate courses are taken, but their credit does not count towards the degree. The same is true of any English language instruction that is required and any instruction in bibliography that is needed.

Residency: At least one year of full-time study is required. See section 05.01 (Residency) for more information.

Requirement Credits
Applied Lessons (460A) 20-24
Research and Writing Seminars – Consisting of one of the following: (A) four MHS 590s (B) three MHS 590s plus one of the following: TH 481, TH 482, TH 581, TH 582, TH 590, MUY 400- or 500-level course, or independent study at the 500 level (major document required) (C) two MHS 590s (6 credits) plus a doctoral research project1 – (6 credits) (D) Dissertation1 – (12 credits) 12

Theory

  • TH 401 (Topics in Tonal Literature & Analysis) – 3 credits,
  • TH 451 (Modal Counterpoint) or TH 452 (18th-Century Counterpoint) – 3 credits

AND either

  • TH 520 (Proseminar in Analysis of Early Music) OR
  • TH 523 (Introduction to the History of Music Theory) – 4 credits
10
Minor/Electives Students are encouraged to develop a minor field in music history, jazz, or choral conducting (normally at least 3 courses, ca. 8-12 cr. hr.) in consultation with their advisor. The minor field, along with the program of study, must receive approval of the Graduate Professional Committee by the third semester of doctoral study (normally after 20 cr. hr. have been taken.Recommended elective courses include: MUY 591-592, PED 451-452, MHS 421 or 424, CND 231 or 223, JCM 451, graduate level foreign language and literature courses, MHS 481-482, OP 410, CHB 431, ENS 207-208, CHB 277, and GTC 401-402. See section 06.03.05 (Program of Study) for more information. 14-18
Remedial courses If required by placement exams, these courses do not count toward total credits for the degree. See section 06.03.04 (Remedial Courses – DMA) and section 05.03 (Placement Examinations and Remediation) for further information.
Total Credits 60

1 If option C or D is chosen, the student must submit a proposal to the Graduate Professional Committee. The Graduate Committee will vote on the proposal. At least one member of this faculty committee will be from the music education, musicology, or music theory departments. In addition, if option C or D is chosen and the doctoral research project/dissertation does not involve work in music history, then students will be required to take a total of 9 credits of MHS 590 courses, 6 credits of which will count within their research and writing component of the degree, and 3 credits of which will count in the elective category. See section 06.03.08 (Doctoral Dissertation/Research Project) for additional information.

Additional Requirements

Foreign Language: Two foreign languages are required for this major, based on the student’s research interest. Proficiency in Italian, German, or French(the equivalent of two years of undergraduate study) will be demonstrated by passing a written exam, which will consist of a passage from a contemporary theory treatise or from the secondary literature on the lute or harpsichord. If students pass a fourth semester language course (e.g. FR 202G or GER 202G) with a B+ or higher, their language requirement is fulfilled. On the recommendation of the chair and the approval of the Graduate Dean, up to two credits in a required foreign language at the 200-level or higher may be used for degree credit.

Assessment of Language Competency for Doctoral Students

Jury: Required. See section 06.01.03 (Graduate Juries) for more information.

Recitals: Doctoral students in the early music major will present three degree recitals as follows:

      • ESM 501 (First Doctoral Recital) – solo
      • ESM 502 (Second Doctoral Recital) – collaborative
      • ESM 503 (Doctoral Lecture Recital) – see section 06.03.06 (Lecture Recital) for more information.

Comprehensive Examinations: Required. See section 06.03.07 (Comprehensive Examinations – DMA) for more information.

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06.03.12 DMA – Major in Jazz Studies & Contemporary Media

Students who enrolled in their current DMA degree program prior to summer 2009 are not affected by the updates indicated below. Please click here for degree requirements for students who enrolled in spring 2009 or earlier.

Prerequisites: Prerequisites for the DMA in Jazz Studies and Contemporary Media include a master’s degree in jazz or a related field.

Upon entry to the program, students take placement exams in music theory and history. If remediation is required, the appropriate courses are taken, but their credit does not count towards the degree. The same is true of any English-language instruction that is required and any instruction in bibliography that is needed.

Placement Exams: In addition to the music theory and music history placement exams taken by all graduate students (see section 05.03 (Placement Examinations and Remediation) for more information), doctoral students majoring in jazz will also take a separate placement exam in jazz theory. This additional exam is administered and graded by the jazz faculty.

The jazz music theory test consists of two parts:

      1. an aural skills examination focusing on melodic, harmonic, and rhythmic dictation; and
      2. a written test including chord/scale relationships, modal application, dominant chord application, minor variants, re-harmonization, and linear structure.

Students whose skills are lacking in jazz theory will be required to take JCM 119 (Basic Jazz Theory & Aural Skills). Students assigned to this class must enroll in the fall semester of their initial year of study. The student who earns a grade of B+ or better in JCM 119 will be considered to have passed the JCM skills requirement.

If any review courses are required, they will not count toward any other degree requirements and may not be used as elective credit. Such courses will, however, count toward full-time student status during the semester that they are taken.

Residency: At least one year of full-time study is required. See section 05.01 (Residency) for more information.

Requirements for students who enroll in fall 2009 or later:

Requirement Credits

Applied Lessons Choose from any combination of the following options :

  • Applied music study (460A) – 4 credits per semester
  • Advanced Studies in Improvisation (JCM 483-484) – 4 credits per semester
  • Advanced Studies in Jazz Composition (JCM 487-488) – 4 credits per semester
  • Jazz Performance Workshop (JCM 551-552) – 2 credits per semester
20-24
Research and Writing Seminars – Consisting of one of the following: (A) four MHS 590s and/or JCM 590s (B) three MHS 590s and/or JCM 590s plus one of the following: JCM 523, JCM 524, TH 481, TH 482, TH 581, TH 582, TH 590, MUY 400- or 500-level course or independent study at the 500 level (major document required (C) two MHS 590s (6 credits) plus a doctoral research project 1(6 credits) (D) Dissertation 1 (12 credits) 12
Jazz Composition/Arranging Courses to be determined based on background and experience of the student. May include JCM 224-225 (Jazz Composition and Arranging II & III), and JCM 485 & 486 (Advanced Studies in Jazz Composition). 6
Theory Six credits as determined by the student, his/her advisor and the result of placement tests. At least one course must be an analysis course (TH 401, 402, 511, 513, or 531). JCM 523 or 524, or any 400- or 500- level theory course may serve as the second course. TH 400 may not be used. 6
Minor/ElectivesStudents are encouraged to develop a minor field (normally at least three courses, ca. 8-12 credit hours) in consultation with their advisor. See section 06.03.05 (Program of Study) for more information. 12-16
Remedial courses If required by placement exams, these courses do not count toward total credits for the degree. See section 06.03.04 (Remedial Courses – DMA) and section 05.03 (Placement Examinations and Remediation) for further information.
Total Credits 60

 

1 If option C or D is chosen, the student must submit a proposal to the Graduate Professional Committee. The Graduate Committee will vote on the proposal. At least one member of this faculty committee will be from the music education, musicology, or music theory departments. In addition, if option C or D is chosen and the doctoral research project/dissertation does not involve work in music history, then students will be required to take a total of 9 credits of MHS 590 courses, 6 credits of which will count within their research and writing component of the degree, and 3 credits of which will count in the elective category. See section 06.03.08 (Doctoral Dissertation/Research Project) for additional information.

2 See section 06.03.05 (Program of Study) for additional restrictions on DMA minors and electives. It is expected that a student in this major would not normally minor in music history, since that level of interest would probably direct the student to major in performance and literature with a jazz minor.

Additional Requirements

Jury: Normally, all DMA JCM students are expected to take a departmental jury during their first year of residency at Eastman. See section 06.01.03 (Graduate Juries) for additional information.

Recitals: Students majoring in Jazz Studies and Contemporary Media will present three recitals. The proportion between lecture and solo recitals will vary according to individual needs and students are expected to use different repertory for solo recitals from that used in the lecture recital(s). Students are encouraged to complete/pass at least two of these three recitals by the end of their second year of study. Students will register for each recital during the semester that it occurs, as follows:

      • ESM 501 (First Doctoral Recital)
      • ESM 502 (Second Doctoral Recital)
      • ESM 503 (Doctoral Lecture Recital- see section 06.03.06 (Lecture Recital) for more information.

Foreign Language: There is no foreign language requirement for this major, except in those instances where the knowledge of a foreign language is essential to research or other work in a specific field.

Comprehensive Examinations: Required. The comprehensive examinations will consist of a written examination in the fields of music history, literature, and theory, and an oral examination of a broad nature covering the student’s major and minor fields of study. Please see section 06.03.07 (Comprehensive Examinations – DMA) for additional information and policy regarding these exams.

For Jazz Studies and Contemporary Media majors, the written examination will include jazz history, theory, and literature questions in addition to non-jazz questions, and will be designed in such a way that the jazz student will be on equal footing with the non-jazz student. DMA JCM students take a jazz skills and analysis Part III of the exam in lieu of the Part III (Skills and Analysis for students who matriculated before fall 2009; Analysis (only) for students who matriculated in fall 2009 or thereafter) required of all other DMA students.

Jazz Studies and Contemporary Media majors who plan to submit a full dissertation to satisfy the requirements of the degree must pass the comprehensive examinations at least six months before the final examination. Students not writing a dissertation or doctoral research project will sit for the comprehensive examinations after all academic requirements (i.e., coursework) of the degree, two of the performance requirements, plus the departmental jury have been completed. (Revised 6/24/09).

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06.03.13 DMA – Major in Music Education

Students who enrolled in their current DMA degree program prior to summer 2009 are not affected by the updates indicated below. Please click here for degree requirements for students who enrolled in spring 2009 or earlier.

Prerequisites: Proficiencies required for entrance to the program include professional experience as an accomplished educator with teaching experience in a variety of settings. Teaching skill is demonstrated through a videotape submission before the interview, and through references that address teaching success. Applicants submit a teaching portfolio which includes examples of student work, concert programs, and performance reviews. With regard to proficiency on an instrument or voice, evidence of preparation in the applied area is provided by a transcript indicating prior study, a resume of concert and recital performances, and references. The applicant auditions with repertoire appropriate to pursue doctoral level study on the instrument.

Upon entry to the program, students take placement exams in music theory and history. If remediation is required, the appropriate courses are taken, but their credit does not count towards the degree. The same is true of any English-language instruction that is required and any instruction in bibliography that is needed.

Residency: At least one year of full-time study is required. See section 05.01 (Residency) for more information.

Requirement Credits
Applied Music Study (460A) 4 to 5 semesters at 4 credits per semester; two semesters must be consecutive. 16-20

Music Education Courses Required music education courses, if not previously taken during a master’s degree program at Eastman:

  • MUE 402 (Measurement and Evaluation) – 3 credits
  • MUE 403 (Introduction to Research) – 3 credits
  • MUE 501 (History and Philosophy Seminar) – 3 credits
  • MUE 502 (Curriculum Seminar) – 3 credits

Other music education courses that can also be used if the student has already completed one or more of the above courses:

  • MUE 465 (Instrumental Techniques Seminar) – 3 credits
  • MUE 503 (College Teaching Internship) – 2 credits
  • MUE 504 (Preparing Future Music Faculty) – 2 credits
  • MUE 505 (Seminar in Academic Administration) – 3 credits
  • MUE 506 (Internship in Academic Administration)- 1 to 2 credits
  • MUE 590 (Independent Study) – variable credits
  • Summer courses (in consultation with program advisor)
12

Music History & Theory Six courses consisting of the following:

  • Two theory courses numbered TH 401 or above, and
  • Four graduate music history courses. At least three must be MHS 590 courses and no more than one may be at the 400-level.
18
Electives 0-4
DMA Dissertation Project (MUE 596) – see below 12
Remedial courses – Please refer to 05.03 Orientation, Placement Examinations, and Remediation.
Total Credits 62

 

Foreign Language: There is no foreign language requirement for this major, except in those instances where the knowledge of a foreign language is essential to research or other work in a specific field.

Jury: A jury examination is required in this major if the student has not previously passed a jury during an Eastman master’s degree. The jury should be completed prior to the student’s first doctoral recital. See (Graduate Juries).

Recitals: DMA students in music education will complete the requirements specified in their performance area. In most cases this will consist of one solo recital (ESM 501 First Doctoral Recital) and one lecture recital (ESM 503 Doctoral Lecture Recital).

The lecture recital must be given after the student has matriculated into the DMA program, and after the student has completed the required solo recital. The student will also be asked to provide:

      • A written summary of background research for the lecture recital
      • Aims and objectives of the lecture recital
      • A recording or video of the lecture recital
      • A written self-evaluation of the lecture recital

All DMA lecture recitals are intended to link a theoretical or pedagogical aspect of music with performance. In the DMA music education program of study, the lecture recital must be grounded in music education. Thus, the two advisors for the lecture recital will be the student’s applied teacher and a member of the music education faculty.

See section 06.03.06 (Lecture Recital) for appropriate procedures and timeline for proposing a lecture recital. A committee appointed by the Senior Associate Dean of Graduate Studies will attend and evaluate the recital.

Comprehensive Examination: Required. Music education students take the same written examination required of all DMA students. Please see section 06.03.07 (Comprehensive Examination – DMA) for additional information regarding this exam.

Additional Requirements:

Leadership in the Profession

Students are expected to be articulate advocates for music education, both with academic peers and with school- and community-based music educators. Leadership may take the form of articles published in music education journals, research poster sessions, and workshop/clinic presentations at regional or national conferences. Evidence of this type of work should be presented at the student’s annual and summative reviews (see below).

Annual reviews

Each DMA student in music education will be reviewed annually for progress toward completion of the degree. This will take the form of a scheduled meeting with the music education faculty. Annual reviews normally take place during the spring semester. DMA students in music education are expected to be present for an annual review, even if they are not in residence during the academic year. Normally, the annual review committee will comprise the music education faculty and the student’s applied teacher. For every review, the DMA student in music education should present an updated curriculum vitae and updated program of study. Other components of the reviews are as follows:

      • Performance in the Applied Area: Annual reviews should include program copies from all solo and chamber performances. The student can expect to reflect on how programs were selected, which aspects of personal performance have improved, and which still need to be addressed.
      • Leadership: Annual reviews should include proposals for articles and/or presentations, along with suggested venues. The student can expect to defend the choice of topic and venue, and will also receive suggestions and feedback from faculty for shaping the article or presentation to fit a particular audience or address a particular need in the profession. When presentations are made they should be videotaped and assessed. Assessment means that the student has developed and distributed a brief survey with questions about the effectiveness and usefulness of the presentation. The student should synthesize and summarize the responses to that survey, and after reviewing the videotape, should create a written report that is a reflection on presentation content and style. .
      • Scholarship: Annual review should include proposals for content of the lecture recital and a projection of the completion date.

Summative Review

The summative review is the oral portion of the comprehensive examination for the DMA in music education. The review will take place after the written examination has been successfully passed. Normally, four faculty members comprise the examination committee. These include the DMA advisor, the student’s applied teacher, another representative from the music education faculty and a representative from the musicology or music theory departments. The Senior Associate Dean of Graduate Studies appoints the examination committee.

During the summative review the DMA music education student can expect to address questions from the committee on all aspects of performance, leadership, and scholarship. While examiners will not rehash specific questions from the written qualifying examination, they will use that examination to identify weaknesses, and follow up with similar questions, using examples from the student’s repertoire where possible. As with annual reviews, the student should present an updated curriculum vitae and updated program of study. Other components of the review are as follows:

      • Performance in the Applied Area: Summative review should include a brief overview of all performances.
      • Leadership: Summative review should include copies of all publications and written reports on presentations.
      • Scholarship: Summative review should include all artifacts from the lecture recital, including a program, a videotape of the recital, and any handouts that were distributed to the audience.

The student should also submit a concept paper, which is a proposal for the dissertation. The concept paper should set the context for the dissertation, review the professional literature relevant to the topic of the dissertation, and describe the scholarly procedures that will be employed. The student can expect that the review committee will recommend some changes to the concept paper before it is sent for final approval to the Graduate Professional Committee.

Dissertation

The DMA dissertation must:

      • focus on inquiry that applies principles in music teaching
      • be an original research investigation that synthesizes the student’s performance area with music education issues; and
      • be a scholarly document in tone and presentation

A reading committee guides the dissertation research. Members of this committee are identified in discussion with music education faculty members based upon the student’s area of inquiry and faculty expertise. The committee will normally include the student’s primary advisor, another reader from the music education department faculty, and an outside reader.

Recent dissertations are available at the Sibley Music Library and should be consulted. A list of doctoral research in progress is available from the music education department office.

Deadlines for submission at each phase of dissertation preparation are published on the graduate calendar. One final electronic copy and one final paper copy are to be presented for deposit in the Sibley Music Library, and one final electronic copy is to be presented to the Music Education Department. The candidate should prepare an additional copy for personal use.

See section 06.03.08 (Dissertation/Doctoral Research Project) for additional information.

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06.03.14 DMA – Major in Performance & Literature

Students who enrolled in their current DMA degree program prior to summer 2009 are not affected by the updates indicated below. Please click here for degree requirements for students who enrolled in spring 2009 or earlier.

Prerequisites: A live audition that demonstrates high achievement in performance is required of all applicants to the DMA PRL program. In addition, applicants demonstrate their writing ability by submitting a scholarly paper, and they demonstrate their academic credentials by submitting a transcript of all previous collegiate-level coursework.

Upon entry in the program, DMA PRL students take the placement exams in music theory and history required of all entering graduate students at Eastman. If remediation is required, the appropriate courses are taken, but their credit does not count towards the degree. The same is true of any English-language instruction that is required and any instruction in bibliography that is needed.

Residency: At least one year of full-time study is required. See section 05.01 (Residency) for more information.

Requirement Credits
Applied Music Students must enroll for a minimum of four consecutive semesters (460A – 4 cr)1 20-24
Research and Writing Seminars – Consisting of one of the following: (A) four MHS 590s (B) three MHS 590s plus one of the following: TH 481, TH 482, TH 581, TH 590, MUY 400- or 500-level course, or independent study at the 500 level (major document required) (C) two MHS 590s (6 credits) plus a doctoral research project 2(6 credits) (D) Dissertation 2 (12 credits) 12
Music Theory All students will be required to take TH 401- 402 plus an additional 3-credit doctoral theory course.TH 400 is a master’s-level course and is not acceptable for doctoral credit. With special permission of the instructor, TH 411 (or 511) may be substituted for TH 401, and/or TH 413 (or 513) may be substituted for TH 402. 9
Minor/ElectivesStudents are encouraged to develop a minor field (normally at least 3 courses, ca. 8-12 cr. hr.) in consultation with their advisor. The minor field, along with the program of study, must receive approval of the Graduate Professional Committee by the third semester of doctoral study (normally after 20 credit hours have been taken). The minor field may occasionally involve applied-music study in a secondary instrument or voice; in such cases, a maximum of 6 credit hours of applied-music study may apply towards the minor. See section 06.03.05 (Program of Study) for additional information. 15-19
Remedial courses – Please refer to 05.03 Orientation, Placement Examinations, and Remediation.
Total Credits 60

 

1PRL students who have completed four consecutive semesters of applied-music study and who wish to register for anything less than 4 cr. hr. of applied music in a given semester must submit their request in writing to the Office of Graduate Studies. Exceptions to this policy, for the Summer Session, only, may be made by the Senior Associate Dean of Graduate Studies on the basis of a request from the major applied teacher, endorsed by his or her department chair, and approved by the Senior Associate Dean of Graduate Studies.

Students majoring in performance and literature are guaranteed no more than three years of major applied-music study in their doctoral programs. Any exceptions to these primary (1-hour) lesson limits require the permission of the Senior Associate Dean of Graduate Studies. All D.M.A. Performance and Literature (PRL) students in residence will be enrolled for applied-music study (460A-4 cr. hr.) for a minimum of four consecutive semesters. In addition, they must be registered for one hour lessons (460A) during the semester in which they are preparing and/or performing a solo degree recital or for one-half hour lessons (430A) during the semester in which they are preparing and/or performing a lecture recital or chamber music recital.

2  If option C or D is chosen, the student must submit a proposal to the Graduate Professional Committee. The Graduate Committee will vote on the proposal. At least one member of this faculty committee will be from the music education, musicology, or music theory departments. In addition, if option C or D is chosen and the doctoral research project/dissertation does not involve work in music history, then students will be required to take a total of 9 credits of MHS 590 courses, 6 credits of which will count within their research and writing component of the degree, and 3 credits of which will count in the elective category. See section 06.03.08 (Doctoral Dissertation/Research Project) for additional information.

3 Students in this major may include only one course from MHS 421-426 (as part of the minor or as an elective or as remediation) within their 60-credit-hour program. Additional courses from MHS 421-426 may be required as remediation or elected above and beyond the 60-credit requirement for the degree. See section 06.03.05 (Program of Study) for additional restrictions on DMA minors and electives.

Additional Requirements

Ensemble: Voice majors must enroll in a choral ensemble for one semester, and that semester will be determined by the director of choral activities in consultation with the voice faculty. All voice students in this major must audition for the choral director at the beginning of their first semester of study. This requirement will be waived for students who received a master’s degree from Eastman.

Jury: Required. See section 06.01.03 (Graduate Juries) for more information.

Recitals: Three recitals are required; normally, the student presents two solo recitals and one lecture recital. The proportion between lecture and solo recitals will vary according to individual needs and students are expected to use different repertory for solo recitals from that used in lecture recitals. All DMA PRL students are encouraged to perform at least two of their three recitals by the end of their second year of study. Programs for all required performances must be approved by the student’s major teacher. These presentations will represent work the student and his or her major teacher have done together through registrations for study both before and concurrent with the times of the events. A faculty committee will be in attendance at each public program and will pass upon its acceptance.

DMA PRL students in piano are required to play a fourth degree recital which is collaborative in nature. Collaborative degree recitals may have independent juries of three members for each student degree recitalist, or a single faculty jury of three members who will serve as the jury for all student degree recitalists performing on the program. Piano concerto performances may not be used for collaborative degree recitals. DMA PRL students in piano may not use a collaborative performance to fulfill a Performer’s Certificate requirement.

Comprehensive Exam: Required. See section 06.03.07 (Comprehensive Examination – DMA) for more information.

Foreign Language (Voice majors only): Voice students must demonstrate proficiency in French, German, and Italian. Upon matriculation, student transcripts will be evaluated for evidence of foreign language study. If the student does not possess the necessary degree of proficiency, s/he will be required to pass the first semester of a freshman-level language course with a grade of B or higher.

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06.03.15 DMA – Major in Piano Accompanying & Chamber Music

Students who enrolled in their current DMA degree program prior to summer 2009 are not affected by the updates indicated below. Please click here for degree requirements for students who enrolled in spring 2009 or earlier.

Prerequisites: Prerequisites for the DMA in ACM include a master’s degree in accompanying, piano performance, or a related field. Students audition in person, performing with singers and instrumentalists at Eastman. They also must submit a research paper demonstrating advanced analytic, scholarly, and writing abilities.

Upon entry in the program, DMA students in ACM take the placement exams in music theory and history required of all entering graduate students at Eastman. If remediation is required, the appropriate courses are taken, but their credit does not count towards the degree. The same is true of any English-language instruction that is required and any instruction in bibliography that is needed.

Residency: Majors in ACM will normally be in residence for two full academic years. Students who received a Master of Music in Piano Accompanying and Chamber Music from Eastman may be required to be in residence for only one year. See section 05.01 (Residency) for more information.

Requirement Credits
Applied Music ACM 460A (Applied Accompanying Lessons) – four to five semesters at 4 credits each. 16-20
Music History and Music Theory: must include at least three doctoral music history seminars 19-21
Minor: developed in consultation with the program advisor, in an area such as pedagogy, Baroque performance practice, opera coaching, or interdisciplinary studies in the humanities. See section 06.03.05 (Program of Study) for more information. 10-12
Electives: May include keyboard study. See section 06.03.05 (Program of Study) for more information. 11-15
Remedial courses – Please refer to 05.03 Orientation, Placement Examinations, and Remediation.
Total Credits 60

Additional Requirements

Jury: Student in this major will perform a jury in December of the first year in residence. In rare instances, students may be allowed to perform their jury the following December. See section 06.01.03 (Graduate Juries) for more information.

Foreign Language Requirements: As a prerequisite to admission, students in the piano accompanying and chamber music major will have developed language proficiency equivalent to at least one year of college-level instruction in one of the following languages: French, German, or Italian. This proficiency is tested by a language/diction examination administered during the student’s first semester of enrollment. Before the end of the second year of residency, each DMA candidate in this major will have developed reading proficiency in one of the remaining languages equivalent to at least one year of college-level instruction in that language, and diction proficiency in English, French, German, and Italian. These requirements must be satisfied in one of the following ways before the student is permitted to undertake the comprehensive examinations: by successful completion of a departmental examination in translation and pronunciation; by completing the appropriate diction course and the equivalent of one year of college-level language study with a grade of “B+” or higher in each language. See Language Requirements for ACM Majors for more information.

Degree Recitals:

      • ESM 503 (Doctoral Lecture Recital- see section 06.03.06 (Lecture Recital) for more information.
      • ESM 505 (DMA Accompanying Recital with Vocalist)
      • ESM 506 (DMA Accompanying Recital with Instrumentalist)
      • ESM 507 (DMA Accompanying Collaborative Recital)

Comprehensive Exam: Required. See section 06.03.07 (Comprehensive Examinations – DMA) for more information.

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